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Lecture 8

Thorough Notes on Lecture 8

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Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOCC44H3
Professor
Ivanka Knezevic

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SOCC44H3Media and SocietyFri, March 18, 2011
Lecture 08
Guest Speaker
Listening to rap: cultures of crime, cultures of resistance
Since he did his study in the early 1960s, there was a change in the music industry (at the time it
was all rock and roll). Rap music began to take off.
Rap was represented as having a corrosive influence on the behaviour of young people
Due to its strong ties to pop culture in the media, rap music had ill effects on those who listened
to it
Woman (name?) conducted a study on Hard rock and Rap music and how they were perceived
in the media
She found that, where heavy metal was seen as developing ill effects on individuals, rap
music had ill effects on the whole society
First reason why rap was seen as a greater societal threat, rap was seen as being more
societally harmful due to it's alliance with aggression and violent language
Second, the assumptions it made of its audience
it would assume that its audience was made up on young black people
**If there ever was a case to be made that the rap audience was primarily a black one, those
assumptions dissolved as rap became more popular.
**Rap had grown a much larger audience and it became a more diverse and multicultural
phenomena
The two representations still remained however, 1) the representation of it being violent, but
there were also those who defend rap
2nd representation: There were those who saw rap as an authentic statement of what it's like
to grow up at a disadvantage
to be subjected to racial profile, to be subjected by the police, being taken advantage of
in the labour market
In his study he wanted to see two basic questions:
Key Questions
1. Are univorous rap fans (urban music enthusiasts) different from other music fans in terms of
their identifications with criminal and resistant representations of the music? (Are rap fans
different from other kinds of music fans in terms of their affiliations with the ill effects and the
defendant effects of rap music?)
2. Is race a source of variation in how UME's engage with the music?
He collected information in a number of different cities
In his survey, For the harmful effects issue, he asked questions like participants involvement in
www.notesolution.com
crime, etc (negative stuff)
For the culturally resistant questions, he asked whether they thought people were treated equally
by: the school system, work force, police, etc
Listening to rap
Having collected information on how much they liked all these different musical genres, he did
a statistical analysis on which genre involved high levels of violence
People who had broad musical tastes were referred to as musical omnivores
Club kids were those interested in club music (techno)
Rockers who listened to rock, typically white males
The group that he was most interested was a group of young people who listened more
exclusively to rap and hip-hop and some soul and r&b to a lesser extent...and nothing else: rap
univores
This group surprisingly didn't include jazz music (lots of famous black jazz musicians)
Interestingly, the kids who listened more exclusively to rap and r&b despised hard rock
music
Hard rock kids felt the same about rap, they generated this bias
They ended up calling exclusively rap fans Urban Music Enthusiasts (UME)
The larger proportion of these fans were black, but there were sizeable proportions within
the fanbase who were white and asian
Compared to fans of other types of music, those UME's were more likely to subscribe to
resistant ideas and values
they were more likely to perceive Canadian society as an unequal one
They were more likely to report criminal behaviour
Findings *not on exam
Black and White UME's are linked to resistant views of the music (but not Asian UME's).
if you were a black or white fan of the music, you'd perceive a lot of inequity in Canadian
society
Asian and white UME's are linked to criminal representations (but not black UME's).
Asians and whites reported more involvements in criminal behaviour
Interpretations
Different racial groups use the same music differently
In his paper he's talking about associations between musical tastes and the representations of the
music
there are a number of views that state that listening to music causes the behaviour, but there
are other views
it could be that kids who've grown up and became violent and aggressive at a young age,
they could have selected a musical genre which is relative to their aggressive
background...they coulda been violent before listening to the music, not after
The largest number of UME's in their study are Blacks, and they're the one group who isn't
related to criminal behaviour to a strong degree...so he says that you can't look at what
popular culture tells you
The question he's asking is what is it that young people do with their music?
www.notesolution.com

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Description
SOCC44H3 Media and Society Fri, March 18, 2011 Lecture 08 Guest Speaker Listening to rap: cultures of crime, cultures of resistance Since he did his study in the early 1960s, there was a change in the music industry (at the time it was all rock and roll). Rap music began to take off. Rap was represented as having a corrosive influence on the behaviour of young people Due to its strong ties to pop culture in the media, rap music had ill effects on those who listened to it Woman (name?) conducted a study on Hard rock and Rap music and how they were perceived in the media She found that, where heavy metal was seen as developing ill effects on individuals, rap music had ill effects on the whole society First reason why rap was seen as a greater societal threat, rap was seen as being more societally harmful due to its alliance with aggression and violent language Second, the assumptions it made of its audience it would assume that its audience was made up on young black people **If there ever was a case to be made that the rap audience was primarily a black one, those assumptions dissolved as rap became more popular. **Rap had grown a much larger audience and it became a more diverse and multicultural phenomena The two representations still remained however, 1) the representation of it being violent, but there were also those who defend rap 2 representation: There were those who saw rap as an authentic statement of what its like to grow up at a disadvantage to be subjected to racial profile, to be subjected by the police, being taken advantage of in the labour market In his study he wanted to see two basic questions: Key Questions 1. Are univorous rap fans (urban music enthusiasts) different from other music fans in terms of their identifications with criminal and resistant representations of the music? (Are rap fans different from other kinds of music fans in terms of their affiliations with the ill effects and the defendant effects of rap music?) 2. Is race a source of variation in how UMEs engage with the music? He collected information in a number of different cities In his survey, For the harmful effects issue, he asked questions like participants involvement in www.notesolution.com
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