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Lecture 5

WSTB11H3 Lecture Notes - Lecture 5: Teddy Edwards, European Canadian, Discourse Analysis


Department
Women's and Gender Studies
Course Code
WSTB11H3
Professor
Anissa Talahite- Moodley
Lecture
5

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WEEK 5 – WSTB11
THE FAMILY: CONTEMPORARY PERSPECTIVES
1. RECAP: FAMILY/NATION
Last week we discussed how the concepts of family and nation have historically been interconnected. We focused on how
the history of race, slavery and colonialism in North America has shaped both ideas about “family” and “nation”.
2. THE “CONTEMPORARY FAMILY”
What are some of the ways in families have changed in today’s world? Is what Hill-Collins calls the “tradition family idea”
still valid in our contemporary society?
3. THE EXAMPLE OF “MIXED UNIONS” IN CANADA
The number of couples in mixed unions in Canada “has been on the rise since at least the early 1990s” (in 2006, the
census showed that 3.9% of all couples are mixed unions, as opposed to 3.1% in 2001 and 2.6% in 1991)
Mixed unions” in Canada: General trends
Some particular ethnic groups had a higher proportion of couples in mixed unions than others.
-Japanese had the highest proportion marrying or partnering outside of their visible minority group (75%)
-They were followed by Latin Americans (47%), Blacks (41%), Filipino (33%), Southeast Asians (31%), Arabs
and West Asians (25%), Koreans (19%), Chinese (17%), and South Asians (13%)
Intersecting factor: Generation status
“Mixed unions are higher for Canadian born than foreign-born” and a longer duration of residence in Canada does
seem to be associated with a higher proportion of being in a mixed union.”
“Individuals who spend more of their childhood and adolescence in Canada may be more likely to form out-group
conjugal relationships.”
Intersecting factor: Geographical location
CMAs (Census Metropolitan Areas)
-With the highest proportions of couples in a mixed union: Vancouver (8.5%), Toronto (7.1%), and Calgary
(6.1%)
-With the lowest: Saguenay (0.6%), and St. John’s (0.9%)
The authors conclude that “the impact of mixed unions could be far-reaching in changing the dynamic and nature
of Canada’s ethno cultural diversity in future generations.”
Intersecting factors: Sexual Orientation
“A higher proportion of same-sex couples were in mixed unions in 2006 compared to opposite-sex couples.
Almost one in ten (9.8%) same-sex couples were in mixed unions compared to less than one in twenty (3.8)
opposite-sex couples.”
4. EXAMPLE 1: DISCOURSES ABOUT THE “MIXED RACE” BODY (HARITAWORN)
Questions of Haritaworn’s article:
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