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Lecture

Culture-Lecture 1-Cultured Beasts Feb 26 2009

3 Pages
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Department
Anthropology
Course Code
ANT100Y1
Professor
Marcel Danesi

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February 26, 2009
Lecture 1: Cultured Beasts
I. Introduction
II. What is Culture?
x Learned
o Humans= shifts from animal skills-> human skills (communication, form
JURXSVFRRUGLQDWHDFWLYLWLHVHWF«
o ³&XOWXUHG%HDVWV´&ODZVDQGMDZV-> cultural living= these early
humans could learn to do these things then teach their young- GLGQW
have to rely on evolution to build in these behaviours as instinctive
o Dogs came with all their capacity to communicate built in (they knew
how to do it the second they were born)
o Different human groups learn different cultures
o Because cultures are learned and not instinctive- there are many
different kinds of learner behaviours
x Shared
o $Q\WKLQJWKDWLVDFXOWXUDOLGHDV\PEROHWF«ZKLFKRQO\H[LVWVLQRQH
persons head is not culture
x Dynamic
o Cultures; sets of shared meanings- never stay the same
o No human social group- never remain the same through time
o Cultural ideas are constantly changing (dynamic)
o Rapid cultural change is more often in the air then not (globalization)
o What is culture for? - business of function: cultural ideas function (there
for a reason)
o Culture functions as a whole to allow people to maintain and reproduce
their societies through time
o When someone dies- every culture in a whole as a set of ideas pf what
to do next (death rituals)
o Why does every society feel they need to mark death with ritual
practice?
Bring group together (family, community)
Help ppl deal with emotions
Functional analysis of culture
x Functional
o
x Conflictive
o Gender differences, age differences
o Status, ranking differences
o Income differences
o Class differences- ZRUNLQJFODVVFHVHWF«
o All of these different ways of carving out the pop- there is going to be
conflict among/between them
III. How Do Anthropologists Study It?
x Ethnocentric Evolutionists
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Description
February 26, 2009 Lecture 1: Cultured Beasts I. Introduction II. What is Culture? N Learned o Humans= shifts from animal skills-> human skills (communication, form J74:58.447L3,90,.9L;L9L0809. o :O9:700,898O,Z8,3M,Z8-> cultural living= these early humans could learn to do these things then teach their young- L39 have to rely on evolution to build in these behaviours as instinctive o Dogs came with all their capacity to communicate built in (they knew how to do it the second they were born) o Different human groups learn different cultures o Because cultures are learned and not instinctive- there are many different kinds of learner behaviours N Shared o 39KL3J9K,9L8,.:O9:7,OL0,82-4O09.ZKL.K43O0[L898L3430 persons head is not culture N Dynamic o Cultures; sets of shared meanings- never stay the same o No human social group- never remain the same through time o Cultural ideas are constantly changing (dynamic)
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