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Lecture 3

ANT100Y1 Lecture Notes - Lecture 3: Tropical And Subtropical Dry Broadleaf Forests, Postorbital Bar, Lorisoidea


Department
Anthropology
Course Code
ANT100Y1
Professor
Ivan Kalmar
Lecture
3

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Oct 06, 2016
Lecture 3: Primate Behavior and Ecology
Characteristics of Primates
Mammals, (warm blooded, have hair, feeding milk to young)
NOT PETS or ACTORS
How they differ from Other Mammals
ACTIVITY PATTERNS
Nocturnal- active during night
Diurnal- active day
Crepuscular- active at dawn and dusk
Cathemeral- can be active at any time
DIETS
Variety fruit, insect, flowers, leaves
Few specialize most/ only leave, special gut adaptations to digest, or insects
Generally, larger eat leaves and smaller eat insects
TAXONOMY
STREPSIRHINE CHARACTERISTICS
Dental tooth comb
Moist rhinarium (olfactory sensitivity)
Unfused mandibular and frontal symphases
Tapitum lucidum
Postorbital bar
Two superfamilies: lemuroidea, lorisoidea
Lemuroidea
Lorisoidea
Madagascar and Comoro Islands
Lorises and galagos
Arboreal quadrupeds and leapers, some
partially terrestrial
Varied diets
Many small bodied are nocturnal
Quadruped tree
Varied diet
nocturnal
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tropical dry forest
Loris infant “parking”, coated in poison
HAPLORHINE CHARACTERISTICS
Dry nose
Retinal fovea
Postorbital closure
Fused mandibular and frontal symphases (except for tarsier)
Three infraorders:
o Tarsiiformes
o Platyrrhini
o Catarrhine
Tarsiiformes
Platyrrhines (New World)
Catarrhini (Old World)
Tarsiers
Central/South America
Africa, Asia, SE Asia
Southeast Asia
110g 11.4 kg
1kg 175 kg
80-130g
Some have prehensile
tail
Cercopithecidae,
hylobathidaem
hominidae
Large eyes, fused
lower leg bones
Most are entirely
arboreal
Variety of diets, social
organizations, and
adaptations
Faunivorous
Cebidae, atelidae,
callitriehdae
Body Size
Scaling: Area (l*w) and volume (l*w*d) change at different rates
o Animal that doubles in size will be eight times heavier
Small animals have greater heat (energy) loss than larger animals
Primate Habitat
Tropical rainforests, dry forests, deserts, savannas
Primary vs. secondary forests (come back after damage)
Ecological niche
Forest microhabitats
o Emergent layer
o Canopy
o Understory
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