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Lecture

Primate & Early human Evolution

4 Pages
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Department
Anthropology
Course Code
ANT100Y1
Professor
Christopher Watts

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Anthropology October 14th, 2010.
Primate & Early human Evolution
Major Epochs during Teritary Period:
PaleocenePrimates
Very different from present-day conditions
Hotter, more humid
Wethink first primates show up
Paleocene & Primate-like mammals: Plesiadapiformes
Body size: tiny, shorew-sized to size of small dog
Niche: likely solitary, nocturnal quadrupreds, well-developed sense of smell
Diet: insects and seeds
Used to be classified as primates because of primate-like teeth and limbs that are
adapted for arboreal lifestyle
Recent: Plesiadapids NOT Primates
1.No postorbital bar
2.Claws instead of nails
3.Eyes placed on side of head
4.Enlarged incisors
Eocene
Two Main Eocene Primate Families
1.Adapidae
Body size: 100g to 6900g
Diurnal and nocturnal forms
Mainly arboreal quadrupeds, some may have been specialized leapers
Smaller adapids ate mostly fruit and insects, larger forms ate more fruits and
leaves
Led to lemurs?
2.Omomyidae
Body size: 45g to 2500g
Some nocturnal other diurnal
Omomyid thought to been specialized leapers
Teeth: adapted for eating insects and soft fruits, only few species were leaf-eaters
Led to Tarsiers?
Omomyid (Shoshonius) and What we think they looked like
Warning: similarity in form does nOT always equate with close phylogenetic
relationships
www.notesolution.com

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Description
th Anthropology October 14 , 2010. Primate & Early human Evolution Major Epochs during Teritary Period: Paleocene Primates Very different from present-day conditions Hotter, more humid We think first primates show up Paleocene & Primate-like mammals: Plesiadapiformes Body size: tiny, shorew-sized to size of small dog Niche: likely solitary, nocturnal quadrupreds, well-developed sense of smell Diet: insects and seeds Used to be classified as primates because of primate-like teeth and limbs that are adapted for arboreal lifestyle Recent: Plesiadapids NOT Primates 1. No postorbital bar 2. Claws instead of nails 3. Eyes placed on side of head 4. Enlarged incisors Eocene Two Main Eocene Primate Families 1. Adapidae Body size: 100g to 6900g Diurnal and nocturnal forms Mainly arboreal quadrupeds, some may have been specialized leapers Smaller adapids ate mostly fruit and insects, larger forms ate more fruits and leaves Led to lemurs? 2. Omomyidae Body size: 45g to 2500g Some nocturnal other diurnal Omomyid thought to been specialized leapers Teeth: adapted for eating insects and soft fruits, only few species were leaf-eaters Led to Tarsiers? Omomyid (Shoshonius) and What we think they looked like Warning: similarity in form does nOT always equate with close phylogenetic relationships www.notesolution.com
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