Class Notes (835,374)
Canada (509,147)
Anthropology (1,673)
ANT100Y1 (959)
Shawn Lehman (283)
Lecture

ANT 100 October 11th 2012.docx

4 Pages
99 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Anthropology
Course
ANT100Y1
Professor
Shawn Lehman
Semester
Fall

Description
ANT 100 October 11 2012th Gfytdfrgfygtfvubjbbjjhugbuvylkoijyhugty7 Lecture 4: Primate & Early Human Evolution Lecture goals - General patterns of morphology and phylogenetics for fossil primates - What a hominin is in terms of taxonomy - Morphological trends in hominin evolution: - Bipedalism - Expansion in brain size - Changes in dental/cranial Time frame and climate: On a continuous decrease in temperature from the Paleocene period . Paleocene “Primates” - Geography and climate - Very different from present-day conditions - Hotter, more humid Paleocene and primate-like mammals: Plesiadapiformes - Body size: tiny, shrew sized to size of small dog - Niche: Likely solitary, nocturnal quadrupeds; well-developed sense of smell - Diet: insects and seeds - Used to be classified as primates because of primate-like teeth and limbs that are adapted for arboreal lifestyle Recent: Plesiadapids NOT primates 1) No postorbital bar, 2) 2) claws instead of nails, 3) Eyes placed on side of head, & 4) Enlarged incisors. Two main Eocene Primate: Families 1) Adapidae - Body size: 100g to 6900g - Diurnal and nocturnal forms - Mainly arboreal quadrupeds, some may have been specialized leapers - Smaller adapids ate mostly fruit and insects, larger forms ate more fruit and leaves - Led to lemurs?? - 2) Omomyidae - Body size of 45 g to 2500 g - Some nocturnal others diurnal - Omomyids thought to been specialized leapers - Teeth: adapted for eating insects and soft fruits, only few species were leaf-eaters - Led to tarsiers?? Omomyid (Shoshonius) and what we think they looked like - Warning: Similarity in form does NOT always equate with close phylogenetic relationships Oligocene Primates - Three haplorhine features: - Fused frontal bone, - Full postorbital closure - Fused mandibular symphasis - Three taxonomic groups: - Parapithecidae - Propliopithecidae - And Platyrrhini South American Primates - Primates appear for first time in fossil record of South America towards late Oligocene - Origins of South American primate unclear - May have “rafted” over from Africa Miocene Primates - 3 sequential sub-epochs for apes - Early Miocene apes - Mid Miocene apes - Late Miocene apes - Miocene monkeys (See textbook) - (we did not evolve from monkeys and apes, we evolved from a common ancestor back in time) Miocene Primates - Early Miocene (23.0 – 16.0 MYA), monkey
More Less

Related notes for ANT100Y1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit