Class Notes (837,488)
Canada (510,274)
Anthropology (1,678)
ANT333Y1 (29)
Lecture 2

Lecture 2.docx

4 Pages
181 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Anthropology
Course
ANT333Y1
Professor
Shawn Lehman
Semester
Fall

Description
ANT333 Lecture 2 - Review of Living Primates & Systematics: Strepsirhines. *Know cladistics chart Modern Gradistic View of Primate Classification Strepsirhines  Many aspects of the teeth, skulls, and limbs of strepsirhines are similar to those found in primates of the Eocene epoch (50-40 MYA).  It is the retention of primitive features that characterize strepsirhines.  Not “primitive”, their traits have allowed them to survive for many years without having to change Strepsirhines United by 3 Specialized Features of “Hard Anatomy” 1. Tooth Comb - Lower incisors, used for grooming 2. Laterally flaring talus - Heel bone 3. Grooming claw on second digit of feet. - The rest are nails Skull of Strepsirhines: Retains Primitive Primate Features  Simple postorbital bar (without postorbital closure)  Relatively small braincase – compared to haplorhines  Primitive mammalian nasal region with a sphenoid recess o Nose sticks out – rely more on olfaction o Wet rhinarium Strepsirhine Reproductive System: Primitive Primate Characteristics  At least two pairs of nipples  A bicornate uterus - two sides - primitive  Epitheliochorial type of placentation Families of Extant Strepsirhines Madagascar _________ Africa ___________ Asia - Cheirogaleids - Lorises - Lorises - Lemurids - Galagos - Indriids - Lepilemurids - Daubentoniids Five families in Lemuroidea (Malagasy lemurs) 1). Cheirogaleidae 2). Lemuridae 3). Lepilemuridae “-idea” ending = family 4). Indriidae 5). Daubentaniidae 1 I. Family Cheirogalidae  Five extant genera: 1). Microcebus – Mouse lemur 2). Mirza – Coquerel’s Dwarf lemur 3). Cheirogeleus – Dwarf lemur 4). Phaner – Fork-marked lemur 5). Allocebus – Hairy-eared dwarf lemur Family Cheirogaleidae: 1. Genus Microcebus  Smallest living primates (23-60 g)  Nocturnal, most active just after nightfall and before sunrise  Omnivorous (insects, fruit, nectar).  Solitary foragers & seasonal breeders  Abundant  Massive Predation  Five fingers 2. Genus Mirza  Mirza (300-325 g) substantially bigger than Microcebus  Found higher in forest, tend to prefer thicker and taller trees  Diet is similar to Microcebus expect Mirza eat more gum 3. Genus Cheirogaleus  C. medius group (280 g) found in western & southern dry forests, C. major group (360-440 g) in humid forests of eastern and southern Madagascar.  Five months in hibernation  Primarily frugivorous, supplement diet with insects and leaves  Store fat in tails  All Cheirogalids hibernate for months of each year  Pollinate flowers 4. Genus Phaner  Largest cheirogaleid (460 g)  Specialized gum feeders  Long procumbent incisors, long canines, long narrow tongue, large caecum (digestive system allows for fermentation, & keeled fingernails 5. Genus Allocebus  Rediscovered in the late 1980s in NE Madagascar  Weighs 84 - 92 g  Little
More Less

Related notes for ANT333Y1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit