Ast101 Lecture - November 29.pdf

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Department
Astronomy & Astrophysics
Course Code
AST101H1
Professor
Michael Reid

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Ast101 Lecture November 29, 2012 - Review Session - December 10, 2-4 OISE G162 - cumulative - twice the length of the midterms but we have four times as much time - 3 hours - the Doppler method works on the idea that when a planet is orbiting a star, it "drags" the star around a little circle - they orbit their common center of mass - we cannot actually see the planet, but rather notice changes in the star's spectral lines - this means that the star is being dragged toward and away from us as it orbits the common center of mass - Astar is orbited by an exoplanet. When the star is moving away from us, the star's spectral lines will be redshifted - Astar is orbited by an exoplanet. When the planet is moving away from us, the star's spectral lines will appear blue-shifted - can be represented on a radial velocity curve (radial velocity is motion towards or away from us) - Imagine two exoplanets orbiting the same star. Planet Ahas a mass half that of Jupiter and orbits at 5 AU. Planet B has a mass twice that of Jupiter and orbits at 5.1 AU. Which one will produce a bigger Doppler shift in the star's spectrum? - a more massive planet will have a greater force of gravity on the planet star - since in the equation it is distance squared, a small change in distance will create a larger change in gravity - in this case though, the difference in mass matters more because it is a factor of - the one that is more massive will produce a larger effect on the star - we can use
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