CDN267H1 Lecture Notes - Lecture 6: Lawren Harris, John Diefenbaker, Noble Savage

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9 Dec 2018
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Beginning of class: finished week 6 lecture (outline updated) Two incompatible images of the north (mainly the arctic) have emerged. Dominant view has represented north as both a wilderness and unique national identifier. Reinforced by the words and actions of officials, artists, and intellectuals. Inuit and other indigenous peoples in the arctic see dominant representations as myths. They see north as place of connectivity and place where they are central to its story. Animated by indigenous push for self-governance and climate change: dominant attitudes about the north. Image of north as arctic wilderness emerged early on. Imported by europeans in 18th and early 19th century: part of wilderness appreciation movement. Flourished in victorian era amidst continuing european search for northwest passage. Canada inherited european vision of north after confederation. Drew from ideas of anglo-saxon racial superiority. Belief that northern living made canada strong and distinct. North imposed a form of natural selection: climate weeded out people who could not adapt.

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