Class Notes (923,199)
CA (543,146)
UTSG (45,887)
CHM (641)
CHM135H1 (336)
Lecture

Notes taken during lecture

3 Pages
95 Views

Department
Chemistry
Course Code
CHM135H1
Professor
Kris Quinlan

This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full 3 pages of the document.
LECTURE 5 – States of Matter
Slide No. Notes
2-intermolecular forces determine state of matter
-for instance, if intermolecular forces very strong, state of matter is
solid
3- 2 molecules approach each other, not bonding
5-opposites attract
-the stronger the charges, the stronger the attraction
-mixtures are where dipole-dipole interactions occur: need for ions and
polar molecules
6-leftside: lower energy state with many attraction forces
-rightside: dipoles are moving around
-H-bonding present in DNA, between strands
-F, N, and O are the only elements that can H-bond because they are in
the first row of the periodic table, so they are small, so H can get
close to the nucleus of these elements, therefore closer attraction
7- how readily dispersed
8 -range of ion-dipole strength because it depends on charge of ion, and
size of molecule’s dipole
-London dispersion forces range from smaller to larger than dipole-
dipole’s range
-Large molecules have strong dispersion forces because of the
presence of many electrons
-For similarly sized molecules, dipole interactions are stronger
9-as number of carbon atoms increase, boiling point increases
-the bigger the molecule, the more attractions between partially
negative and partially positive sides of neighbouring molecules
-boiling = causing molecules to move faster, to move apart, to change
in the gas phase – NO BONDS are broken
-straight-chain versus branched pentane – the former has a higher
surface area
-therefore, shape matters in both dipole moments and dispersion
forces’ strength
10 -Ans: D
-no dipole moment therefore will look at dispersion forces
-most electrons means strongest dispersion forces
12 -plateaus are where melting and boiling occurs
-energy goes into overcoming intermolecular forces
13 - Ex. sugar cube into coffee spontaneously dissolves
14 - upward-pointing arrow – depends on temperature if spontaneous or not
15 -Ans: C
-Volume does change – ex. liquid to gas
16 -equilibrium – having evaporating water while also have gases
www.notesolution.com

Loved by over 2.2 million students

Over 90% improved by at least one letter grade.

Leah — University of Toronto

OneClass has been such a huge help in my studies at UofT especially since I am a transfer student. OneClass is the study buddy I never had before and definitely gives me the extra push to get from a B to an A!

Leah — University of Toronto
Saarim — University of Michigan

Balancing social life With academics can be difficult, that is why I'm so glad that OneClass is out there where I can find the top notes for all of my classes. Now I can be the all-star student I want to be.

Saarim — University of Michigan
Jenna — University of Wisconsin

As a college student living on a college budget, I love how easy it is to earn gift cards just by submitting my notes.

Jenna — University of Wisconsin
Anne — University of California

OneClass has allowed me to catch up with my most difficult course! #lifesaver

Anne — University of California
Description
LECTURE 5 States of Matter Slide No. Notes 2 - intermolecular forces determine state of matter - for instance, if intermolecular forces very strong, state of matter is solid 3 - 2 molecules approach each other, not bonding 5 - opposites attract - the stronger the charges, the stronger the attraction - mixtures are where dipole-dipole interactions occur: need for ions and polar molecules 6 - leftside: lower energy state with many attraction forces - rightside: dipoles are moving around - H-bonding present in DNA, between strands - F, N, and O are the only elements that can H-bond because they are in the first row of the periodic table, so they are small, so H can get close to the nucleus of these elements, therefore closer attraction 7 - how readily dispersed 8 - range of ion-dipole strength because it depends on charge of ion, and size of molecules dipole - London dispersion forces range from smaller to larger than dipole- dipoles range - Large molecules have strong dispersion forces because of the presence of many e
More Less
Unlock Document


Only page 1 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit