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Lecture

February 16 Lecture

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Department
Classics
Course Code
CLA204H1
Professor
D.Sells

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CLA204 February 16, 2011 Perseus, Jason, Meleager and OrpheusLecture
5
Common Themes in Myth
1.Tricks and riddles
2.Transformations
3.Accidental killing
4.Giants, monsters and serpents
5.Eliminating a rival by setting an impossible task
6.Quests completed with divine aid
7.Contests
8.Punishment for impiety
9.Displacement of parents
10. Infanticide
11.Revenge
12.Sons protecting mothers
13.Disputes within the family
14.Deceitful wives/daughters
15. Incestuous relationships
16.Founding a city
17.Special weapons
18.Prophets, seers, oracles
19.Liaisons between gods and mortals
20.Perils of immortality
21.External soul/life tokens
22.Unusual births
23. Imprisonment and release
-meden agan (nothing to excess); the golden mean  
-civilization vs. savagery
-ephebeia and rites of passage transfer one period of life through the next; exiled man who suffers test,
and is reintegrated as a changed citizen (ephebeia; young man on the verge of adulthood)
-many myths revolve around Argolid plain of Greece, where bronze age, Mycenae and Tiryns were located
Perseus was born of Danae and Zeus, married Andromeda and had Electryon and Alcaeus who birthed,
Alcmene and Amphityron, and them, Heracles
-Eponymous, eponym give your name to something (Memphis, Lybia, Aegyptus, Danaus/Danae)
-Argus, Argeiphontes (killing of Argus)
-loyalty to husband and loyalty to father
-Danaids = descendents of Danaus, Proetids, Nereids, Atreides etc.
-Proetus; king of Argos; Bellarophon accidentally killed someone and has to run away from home, Proetus
takes him in
- wife Anteia also likes Bellerophon, tied by xenia to Proetus and cannot go against him
-Bellerophon, grandson of Sisyphus (aka Perseus)
Potiphars wife (Genesis) motif, Anteia tells husband Bellerophon tried to rape her, he is angered but cant
do anything because of xenia, so he comes up with a plan
-sends him to Iobates, King of Lycia, to get a letter
-sens Bellerophon on an impossible quest to kill the Chimera
-Perseus trial run
-wicked host sends him on a quest to kill a monster
-god gives him magical help, Pegasus is here, for some reason
-manages to kill the chimera on Pegasus
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Description
CLA204 February 16, 2011 Perseus, Jason, Meleager and Orpheus Lecture 5 Common Themes in Myth 1. Tricks and riddles 2. Transformations 3. Accidental killing 4. Giants, monsters and serpents 5. Eliminating a rival by setting an impossible task 6. Quests completed with divine aid 7. Contests 8. Punishment for impiety 9. Displacement of parents 10. Infanticide 11. Revenge 12. Sons protecting mothers 13. Disputes within the family 14. Deceitful wivesdaughters 15. Incestuous relationships 16. Founding a city 17. Special weapons 18. Prophets, seers, oracles 19. Liaisons between gods and mortals 20. Perils of immortality 21. External soullife tokens 22. Unusual births 23. Imprisonment and release -meden agan (nothing to excess); the golden mean -civilization vs. savagery -ephebeia and rites of passage transfer one period of life through the next; exiled man who suffers test, and is reintegrated as a changed citizen (ephebeia; young man on the verge of adulthood) -many myths revolve around Argolid plain of Greece, where bronze age
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