Class Notes (921,249)
CA (542,492)
UTSG (45,882)
CLA (1,718)
CLA204H1 (435)
D.Sells (10)
Lecture

January 19 Lecture

5 Pages
71 Views

Department
Classics
Course Code
CLA204H1
Professor
D.Sells

This preview shows pages 1-2. Sign up to view the full 5 pages of the document.
CLA204H1 January 19, 2011 Zeus World OrderLecture
2
Homer (c.800 BCE)
-lived somewhere in Asia Minor, wrote Iliad and Odyssey
Iliad: 16,000 lines, story of Greeks in trony, 10th year of the war, wrath of Achilles is the theme of the story,
the war is the context
Odyssey: 12,000 lines, story of Odysseus Nostos 10 year journey home from Troy
-Homer first expresses (in writing) systematic explanation of how the gods, universe, and humanity came
into being
(BC14, Oceanus and Tethys)
-begins after Troy has fallen, takes place over a few weeks
-preserves brief hints of Theogony; earths existence originated from two primordial gods, Oceanus and
Tethys
-poems reflect elements from both Mycenaean world and 8th century BCE, oral tradition, older elements of
culture
-Homeric question: it hasnt been proved that there was a single man named Homer, but that the works
were perhaps written by more than one man, maybe passed down by schools of poets
Hesiod (c.700BCE)
-Theogony and Works and Days
-1st person narrative: Hesiod speaks directly to us (unlike Homer who uses 3rd person) among the first of
these narrators
-born in Asia Minor, but moved with father to Boeotia, Greece
-Shepherd: 9 Muses, goddesses of poetry visit him in a dream on Mt. Helicon and make him a poet
-Theogony: most comprehensive version of how universe, gods and humanity came to be
-poem is thought of as a hymn to Zeus, story of his greatness
-Works and Days: explains human condition, farming, justice
-human analogue vs. Theogony which is another world, time place, chiefly about human beings
Epic Cycle
-vast oral tradition of Epic Saga, bunch of mythological stories about various topics in legend or heroic
myth
-Heroic (Trojan war, Theban war), but also theogonic poems
-composed in writing after Homeric poems by different poems, some on regional/local myths
-all fragmentary, most are lost, anonymous poets
-poems that were popular but not good enough to be known as those like Homers epics
-stories were very old, but agreed committed to the record after the Homeric poems were written
Homeric Hymns (7th/6th century)
-believed to be by Homer in antiquity by the ancients, but the real authors are unknown
-hymns in honour of specific deities: Demeter, Aphrodite, Hermes, Dionysus, Apollo
-cult songs addressed to a god, talking about their powers, influence, why they matter, important cult
sites
-performed at religious festivals
Classical Myth
-performative genres
-choral poetry: singing and dancing in honour of divinity or mortal (athlete) choruses of boys/girls (e.g.
dithyramb, type of choral poem sung and danced by young girls/boys in honour of Dionysus)
-tragedy: dramatization of heroic myth onstage, at festivals of Dionysus
-actors in costume, choruses, mass entertainment
Playwrights include: Aeschylus (525-456), Sophocles (496-406), Euripides (484-406), Aristophanes
www.notesolution.com
-thousand or so tragedies performed between end of 6th and end of the 5th focus chiefly on men and women
of legendary past
Hesiods Theogony: Separation, Succession, Strife
-creation of world order, heroic hymn to Zeus
Important themes: differentiation, male over female, female ambivalence, folktale motifs (deception,
tricksters, divine help), patriarchal world order affirms social reality (what Greek society wanted to
happen is written)
GaiaEarth
-primeval fertility goddess, born from Chaos
-Gaia gives birth to Ouranos (sky), Pontus, Mountains, Oceanus
-Gaia and Ouranos birth the 12 titans, Cyclopes, Hecatonchires (hundred handers)
-Sky and Earth fertility divinities reappear under various guises in Greek myth, symbolic mating of
earth and sky
-recurring male/female principles, rain on earth; growing crops
-women represent fertility and its goodness, but also the dangers of procreation
Succession Myth
- Ouranos hates his children and imprisons them within the Earth, father hating son
- castration of Ouranos, sons rebelling against authoritarian father
- female plot to castrate Ouranos leads to liberation of Titans, creation by Erinyes (furies, punish kin
violence)
-Gaia gives the titan Cronos (crooked counsellor) a sickle against his father
- Ouranos blood creates :
Erinyes (Furies) punish violence against kin
Giants = a violent race
Aphrodite = goddess of sex risen out of foam after Ouranos genitals are thrown in the ocean
- intergenerational conflict paradigmatic
-Gaia takes Cronos aside and tells him to castrate Ouranos with a harpe (tool used for cutting wheat)
-separation of Earth and Sky (Ouranos gets off of Gaia) and two regions are distinctly defined in the world
Monsters (Family of Pontus and Gaia)
-Gorgons, harpies, Echidna, Geryon, Cerberus, Sphinx etc.
-Hybrid creatures, underground, flesh-eating, savage, live on margins of civilization
-forces of disorder, threaten mortals
-symbols of Gaias procreative excess
-function of heroes (Heracles, Perseus) as monster killers bring final end to primordial offspring of Gaia
in reign of the Olympians
-the heroes finish Zeus work by making the world secure in killing these monsters
-Harpies are half bird half female, grab and eat children
-Sirens are half bird half females which sing and enchant shipmen to jump overboard
-Gorgon is known as medusa, flesh-eating monster, snakes for hair, bird wings, otherness
-Hydra is a ten headed snake
-Chimera is a lion, snake, goat monster
Era of Titans
-Cronus and Rhea (doublets of Zeus/Hera)
-give birth to Olympians, swallowed by Cronus because of an oracle that his child would bring him down
-Rhea hides Zeus on Crete, disguises a stone for Zeus and feeds it to Cronus
-Corybants/Curetes take care of Zeus and raise him, young warriors who clash shields to drown out the
sound of his cries
-Zeus makes Cronus vomit all his siblings up (in Hesiods version)
Titanomachy
-Olympians challenge and defeat Titans, their first challenge battle to establish who is in charge
www.notesolution.com

Loved by over 2.2 million students

Over 90% improved by at least one letter grade.

Leah — University of Toronto

OneClass has been such a huge help in my studies at UofT especially since I am a transfer student. OneClass is the study buddy I never had before and definitely gives me the extra push to get from a B to an A!

Leah — University of Toronto
Saarim — University of Michigan

Balancing social life With academics can be difficult, that is why I'm so glad that OneClass is out there where I can find the top notes for all of my classes. Now I can be the all-star student I want to be.

Saarim — University of Michigan
Jenna — University of Wisconsin

As a college student living on a college budget, I love how easy it is to earn gift cards just by submitting my notes.

Jenna — University of Wisconsin
Anne — University of California

OneClass has allowed me to catch up with my most difficult course! #lifesaver

Anne — University of California
Description
CLA204H1 January 19, 2011 Zeus World Order Lecture 2 Homer (c.800 BCE) -lived somewhere in Asia Minor, wrote Iliad and Odyssey Iliad: 16,000 lines, story of Greeks in trony, 10 year of the war, wrath of Achilles is the theme of the story, the war is the context Odyssey: 12,000 lines, story of Odysseus Nostos 10 year journey home from Troy -Homer first expresses (in writing) systematic explanation of how the gods, universe, and humanity came into being (BC14, Oceanus and Tethys) -begins after Troy has fallen, takes place over a few weeks -preserves brief hints of Theogony; earths existence originated from two primordial gods, Oceanus and Tethys th -poems reflect elements from both Mycenaean world and 8 century BCE, oral tradition, older elements of culture -Homeric question: it hasnt been proved that there was a single man named Homer, but that the works were perhaps written by more than one man, maybe passed down by schools of poets Hesiod (c.700BCE) -Theogony and Works and Days st rd -1 person narrative: Hesiod speaks directly to us (unlike Homer who uses 3 person) among the first of these narrators -born in Asia Minor, but moved with father to Boeotia, Greece -Shepherd: 9 Muses, goddesses of poetry visit him in a dream on Mt. Helicon and make him a poet -Theogony: most comprehensive version of how universe, gods and humanity came to be -poem is thought of as a hymn to Zeus, story of his greatness -Works and Days: explains human condition, farming, justice -human analogue vs. Theogony which is another world, time place, chiefly about human beings Epic Cycle -vast oral tradition of Epic Saga, bunch of mythological stories about various topics in legend or heroic myth -Heroic (Trojan war, Theban war), but also theogonic poems -composed in writing after Homeric poems by different poems, some on regionallocal myths -all fragmentary, most are lost, anonymous poets -poems that were popular but not good enough to be known as those like Homers epics -stories were very old, but agreed committed to the record after the Homeric poems were written Homeric Hymns (7 6 century) -believed to be by Homer in antiquity by the ancients, but the real authors are unknown -hymns in honour of specific deities: Demeter, Aphrodite, Hermes, Dionysus, Apollo -cult songs addressed to a god, talking about their powers, influence, why they matter, important cult sites -performed at religious festivals Classical Myth -performative genres -choral poetry: singing and dancing in honour of divinity or mortal (athlete) choruses of boysgirls (e.g. dithyramb, type of choral poem sung and danced by young girlsboys in honour of Dionysus) -tragedy: dramatization of heroic myth onstage, at festivals of Dionysus -actors in costume, choruses, mass entertainment Playwrights include: Aeschylus (525-456), Sophocles (496-406), Euripides (484-406), Aristophanes www.notesolution.com
More Less
Unlock Document


Only pages 1-2 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit