Week 8: Women and Public Life A continuation of the notes on Women and Work (didn't finish that lecture in the alotted time), as well as this week's lecture. Detailed, extensive notes, that are a compilation of both notes taken in class and then from the

28 views17 pages
Published on 16 Oct 2011
School
Department
Course
November 18, 2010
Trades other than woolworking:
Many of these trades were luxury trades—generally women were associated with
luxury so it’s no surprise that they’d end up working in these luxury trades
Noteably absent from trades like sculptor, armour-maker, masonry, woodworking
(these were the highest-status trades, the ones that made the most money, and the
ones that held the most power, in general, for their guilds and people who rose to the
top of them)
Women who worked in trades other than wool-working are often found working with
their husbands
Usually in unusual trades where you wouldn’t really expect women (ex: writing
trades, horse tender, butcher, etc.) the women may have gotten into the trade because
it was a family business, because they had a father that was especially good at it, or
had special talents that got them notices where otherwise women generally wouldn’t
be trained for that sort of trade
Weaver of gold
Ungent boiler
Storeroom attendant
Guilder
Shoemaker
Butcher
Garland maker
Miller
Literate trades
Surprising?
Alchemist
»An extension of their association with witchcraft?
»Generally was something that people with a lot of time on their hands would
do
Reader
»Someone who reads for someone else
»Ex: Cicero’s friend Atticus (an orator), had slaves that stood around reading at
dinner as a form of entertainment
»Ex: Pliny the Elder (or other scholars) who were working on books of their
own would have slaves look up any passages they needed while writing
»Would require that the reader had a pleasant voice, and be literate/educated
»Only one example of a female reader among antiquity
Scribe
»Writes things for other people
Stenographer
»Someone who takes dictation
»In modern times associated with women
»Ex: Pliny the Elder, writing books would dictate
»Ex: slaves writing out letters for owners
»Would probably have to have nice writing
Bookkeeper
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 17 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in
»Only known from a gravestone (husband and wife who were butcher, where
wife was keeping books for business)
Workers with animals
Shepherdess
»Was a slave position almost exclusively
Ibis-feeder
Horse tender
Personal care workers
People who’s primary job was to care for the physical needs of someone else—
primarily slaves, but sometimes freedwomen who had kept up their trade once
they were freed
Trades usually related to women’s roles in homes, and to beauty (related to
sexuality which was also related to motherhood…)
Childcare
»Worked for those who couldn’t (or chose not to) care for their own children
»Wet nurse
Breastfeeds other women’s children for pay, or for as the slave of that
family
Reasons for needing a wet nurse:
Death in the family, especially during childbirth
Foundlings
Women who didn’t want to breastfeed
Only available to the wealthiest people
Some scrutiny of wet nurses—some belief that character was transferred
through the milk to the child
»Nurse
Someone who cares for children—of the wealthy
Not that common, but we hear of them because they’d often have close
relationships with the children they’d raised
Often would eventually be freed by the family they’d served
Usually cared for in old age; were like another mother (and were often
closer to the children than their actual mothers)
»Pedagogue
Someone who cares for children/older children
Also a slave position
Doesn’t necessarily teach children, but is more someone who escorts
children (ie: ‘desireable’ teenage boys) to school, the gym, to make sure
they’re not getting into trouble
Usually watching boys rather than girls, because girls tended to already be
married by the time you had a pedagogue for your children
Beauticians
Lady’s maids
»Wealthy women had people to help them with everything
»Advantages and disadvantages of being a household slave to a wealthy
woman
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 17 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in
Advantages
Household slaves, particularly those with close relationships to their
masters, were likely to have opportunities to earn tips
Were much more likely to be freed, especially in the wills of their
masters
Disadvantage
Also more likely to be under the wrath of an angry mistress—chance
of physical abuse
Hairdressers
»Wealthy Roman women had very complex hairstyles
»Most of the mentions of hairdressers of Roman citizens were of slaves
»Though they were slaves, they could be paid by other people other than their
owners to do their hair—unusual for slaves—and this money could be put
towards their freedom
»Grave inscriptions tell us that sometimes freedwomen were sometimes
hairdressers
Cosmeticians
»Probably also made the makeup they used
»Cosmetics, perfume, and various skincare products were popular among the
upper classes
Roman women, like Greek women, used a toxic white foundation made of
lead, honey, and fat
Would also add a red/purple dye to this to make cream blush
Used soot on their eyelashes and eyebrows
Made (cleansing) facemasks of plants, sheepfat, or breadcrumbs soaked in
milk
Treated pimples with butter, white lead
Treated skin sores with cow placenta
Working outside the home was the major avenue for poor women to enter the public
sphere
For wealthy women there were different options…
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 17 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in

Document Summary

Many of these trades were luxury trades generally women were associated with luxury so it"s no surprise that they"d end up working in these luxury trades. Women who worked in trades other than wool-working are often found working with their husbands. Generally was something that people with a lot of time on their hands would. Ex: pliny the elder, writing books would dictate. Ex: slaves writing out letters for owners. Would probably have to have nice writing. Ex: cicero"s friend atticus (an orator), had slaves that stood around reading at dinner as a form of entertainment. Ex: pliny the elder (or other scholars) who were working on books of their own would have slaves look up any passages they needed while writing. Would require that the reader had a pleasant voice, and be literate/educated. Only one example of a female reader among antiquity.

Get OneClass Grade+

Unlimited access to all notes and study guides.

YearlyMost Popular
75% OFF
$9.98/m
Monthly
$39.98/m
Single doc
$39.98

or

You will be charged $119.76 upfront and auto renewed at the end of each cycle. You may cancel anytime under Payment Settings. For more information, see our Terms and Privacy.
Payments are encrypted using 256-bit SSL. Powered by Stripe.