Class Notes (923,248)
CA (543,180)
UTSG (45,887)
CLA (1,718)
CLA232H1 (202)
Lecture

Introduction

5 Pages
98 Views

Department
Classics
Course Code
CLA232H1
Professor
Victoria Wohl

This preview shows pages 1-2. Sign up to view the full 5 pages of the document.
CLA232 Intro to Greek Culture and SocietyMonday January 10th 2011
Who were the Ancient Greeks?
They often defined themselves as what/who they werent
Not being a non-Greek
Learning about what made a non-Greek helps us understand what is was to be a
Greek
Male vs. Female
Greeks saw themselves as masculine and non-Greeks as feminine
The Greeks also defined themselves against the Gods to think not about what made
them superior (as with barbarians and women) but what gave them limitations
Also used slaves, animals to think about their identity
So, we will be looking at these Others’ through Greek eyes in order to define the
Greek self
It is important to remember that were looking at the Others’ through Greek eyes,
not through their own eyes
The same should be remembered when looking at women looking at them through
male eyes
We will also look at the consequences of these assumptions (seeing women as
irrational would result in Greeks not wanting irrational beings voting/taking part in
politics, for example)
Alterity: the relationship between the Self and Other
One of the dangers alterity entails is giving a false or simplistic definition of the
other so instead of defining what they are, youre just defining them as what you
arent
Can result in xenophobia and misogyny
The other problem with this mode of self-definition is that it can obscure the
similarities between the Self and the Other
www.notesolution.com
CLA232 Intro to Greek Culture and SocietyMonday January 10th 2011
Many of the Greek institutions were actually borrowed from other cultures
(alphabet, language, civic institutions, architecture, etc.)
Geography and Topography of Greece
Economic and cultural interaction throughout the Mediterranean
However, these were the people the Greeks thought were barbarians
So, although there was cultural and economic interdependency, there was also a
sense of cultural superiority and difference
Two important facts about Greek culture follow from its geography:
1.The Greeks were dependent on the sea for their livelihood (food, power, etc.).
Control of the Mediterranean controls the power. So, the parts of Greece with
the strongest navy were the most powerful. Within Athens, those with the most
power were those who rode the navy (the lowest class) which is most likely why
Athens was a democracy
2.The topography. Greece is an extremely mountainous country. Implicates the
daily lives of the Greeks (only about 20-30% of Greece was arable). The stables of
the Greek diet, apart from ocean products, were grains like barley which could be
grown without a lot of land, olives and olive oil, and grapes. Also implicates the
communication between the different parts of Greece ( was difficult). The cities
tended to grow in the valleys between the mountains, meaning that in order to
communicate with a neighbouring city, you had to go through the mountains
(laborious). This affected the growth and development of the cities, rise of the
poleis. The different communities all shared the same language and religion, but
often had different loyalties (generally to their own community) and interests.
So, when we talk about Greece in the ancient period, were talking about a group of
individual poleis
Quick History of the first 1200 years of Greece
Mycenaean Culture
1600 1200 BCE
Important to Greek history because its the topic of the Iliad and the Odyssey
www.notesolution.com

Loved by over 2.2 million students

Over 90% improved by at least one letter grade.

Leah — University of Toronto

OneClass has been such a huge help in my studies at UofT especially since I am a transfer student. OneClass is the study buddy I never had before and definitely gives me the extra push to get from a B to an A!

Leah — University of Toronto
Saarim — University of Michigan

Balancing social life With academics can be difficult, that is why I'm so glad that OneClass is out there where I can find the top notes for all of my classes. Now I can be the all-star student I want to be.

Saarim — University of Michigan
Jenna — University of Wisconsin

As a college student living on a college budget, I love how easy it is to earn gift cards just by submitting my notes.

Jenna — University of Wisconsin
Anne — University of California

OneClass has allowed me to catch up with my most difficult course! #lifesaver

Anne — University of California
Description
CLA232 Intro to Greek Culture and Society Monday January 10 2011th Who were the Ancient Greeks? They often defined themselves as whatwho they werent Not being a non-Greek Learning about what made a non-Greek helps us understand what is was to be a Greek Male vs. Female Greeks saw themselves as masculine and non-Greeks as feminine The Greeks also defined themselves against the Gods to think not about what made them superior (as with barbarians and women) but what gave them limitations Also used slaves, animals to think about their identity So, we will be looking at these Others through Greek eyes in order to define the Greek self It is important to remember that were looking at the Others through Greek eyes, not through their own eyes The same should be remembered when looking at women looking at them through male eyes We will also look at the consequences of these assumptions (seeing women as irrational would result in Greeks not wanting irrational beings votingtaking part in politics, for example) Alterity: the relationship between the Self and Other One of the dangers alterity entails is giving a false or simplistic definition of the other so instead of defining what they are, youre just defining them as what you arent Can result in xenophobia and misogyny The other problem with this mode of self-definition is that it can obscure the similarities between the Self and the Other www.notesolution.com
More Less
Unlock Document


Only pages 1-2 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit