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Lecture 6

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Department
Classics
Course
CLA232H1
Professor
Regina Hoeschele
Semester
Fall

Description
Lecture 6  Bacchants  2 types put against each other (Sophrosune of Apollo + Dionysiac worship of ecstasy and excitement.)  Ambiguity of religion of itself and Dionysiac religions, own ambiguity (unifying and terrorising)  Dionysiac worship  it always us to expense its religion (power of fear)  Dionysiac worship  theatre  You forget yourself  mimesis (1-eis )  imitation of relation  the play  a mimesis of the action  Greeks  fascinated about mimesis how it blurs the line between the real and the illusion  Bacchants  expresses along the themes.  Agaia  killing her child but thinks it’s a lion’s head she is carries  Up in the mountain what is happening?  Bacchants  Puts on a costume of human being  Pentheus actually believes it’s a stranger  Multiple mimesis in terms of the actor  Which is the reality of which is the theatrical illusion.  Metatheatricalcalls its own reminder that it is a theatre  Multiple costumes  Pentheus  changes personality ( becomes a women/ who he wears a female’s costume)  Gets drawn into it and from imitating  to becoming  loses himself  The line of mimesis of reality is central in this play.  Possibly she is holding Pentheus’ mask when she comes down the mountain  Again draws into questioning what we are seeing.  The play as a allegory of mimesis  Also what are the Bacchants themselves  guy dressed as bacchants  When Pentheus charges  he sees double  2 cities = we see 2 things  City Dionysia (Greate)  Festival of Dionysia  3 day fest. spring in Athens  3 tragedies each day (different)  it was entertainment and civic event  in acropolis  up to 9-15 thousand citizens ( Men who were Athenian women were at home)  however its rather bleak on the evidence  If women were there or not  possibly it wasn’t proper females who were there (courtesans, flawed females or foreign females)  Citizens of the Panel would choose the plays themselves  The Athenian gov’t would pay for it.  Everyone saw, no reason not to  tickets would be subsidized if you couldn’t afford it.  405 BE ( after Peloponnesian War)  2 directors needed for the play that year  show how expensive it got?  Acropolis  intentionally built in curvature to allow the voices to be magnified when speaking normally.  Also possible that they wore masks with slightly small megaphones inside.  All actors and chores were males  Some males were specifically trained to play female roles  Religion and civil event  Civic ritual: before the plays  Awarding crown to generals  Awarding crown to benefactors  who had done great services to the city.  Or theatrical display of Athenian imperial power. Parade of orphaned children whose fathers who were killed in wars/battles  They became children of state  Something similar to the reading of Thucydides  Embodies values and propaganda of the city?  Festival similar propaganda  Possible to read it as lesson in Sophrosune  Human definition of limitation, tragedy  A straight forward moral lesson  If so, in a more ambiguous sort of way  Example Oedipus  We can see that it is a lesson of knowing thyself  But also how difficult it is to truly know yourself  Bacchants  Living in excess  ideal  But how do you know if you don’t go through it first.  Tragedy  no absolute resolution  Multiple levels of lessons  Bacchants  Live not in excess but is Dionysus worth worshipping?  Multiple conclusion  Allows us to question and to answer our own questions  Doesn’t teach us what to think but how to think  There is a tragedy aspect  Scene from Satyr play  Shirt, static comedy based on history  Often a humor but in a ludicrous sceneries  Often used far or sex jokes  Satyr  mythic player  Part human  horse tail, pointy ears, dirty beardm even with goat legs  So part horse, goat and man  A myth  when Hera tried to get rid of Dionysus  Zeus saves him by sending him to Satyrs and not a good choice  Spent their days drinking and having sex  Often trying to have their way with anything t
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