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Lecture 14

CLA233 Lecture 14 Notes

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Department
Classics
Course
CLA233H1
Professor
Michael J.Dewar
Semester
Winter

Description
CLA233 Lecture 14 Notes Literature - dactylic hexameter – meter of poetry composed of long, short, short hexameter – six metra of dactyls – name is derived from the Greek word for finger - elegiac couplets – one line of dactylic hexameter and one of dactylic pentameter - in medias res – “in the middle of things” - what literature was like in Rome and what poetry was for the Romans • rhyme was not important • metrical – composed in meter • Latin meter – alternate long and short syllables - most common types of meter • dactylic hexameter • elegiac couplets - anything written in meter is poetry, whatever is not is called prose Genres of Poetry - epic – heroes, gods, monsters, in dactylic hexameter - satire – dactylic hexameter - didactic – educational and beautiful, in dactylic hexameter - elegy – love poetry steeped in Hellenistic tradition - tragedy/drama – plays, mainly Seneca’s tragedies - comedies – new comedy and adapted Greek comedy – Roman new comedy was about young men in love - lyric poetry – different meters, example of Horace and Catullus Poetry - purpose of poetry in Rome was for use and pleasure - utilitos – use - volotos – physical pleasure - poetry as entertainment - utilitos – must teach – usually about being a proper Roman - often authors of poetry were very wealthy – poets often limited to the very rich former slaves and aristocracy - people who read poetry were the people at the very top – about one percent of Roman population – therefore they were the ones who wrote it as well - poetry and literature as a whole in Rome – largely indebted to Greek culture - early 3 century B.C. – all history was written in Greek because it was the language that everything was written in - intertextuality – copying of sources and translations – adaptations of works into Roman - the Greeks were a model for Romans - did not like to do straight translations – must change it somehow in order to be celebrated Greek Sources and Translations - Terrence responds to Lucius of Lavinium - adaptations of Greek poetry – not a straight translation - Terrence hates straight translations - Luscius – translates well but writes badly - could not just translate for work to be good – must adopt Roman attitudes and values - most Romans thought their culture was the best – Cato is particularly harsh with the idea that Greece would corrupt Roman culture and poetry - utilitos was prevalent in Roman poetry – talk about Roman values – very distinct from Greek poetry - poetry of the Greeks did not have the celebrated Roman values – pietas, mos maiorum, etc. - Athenian poetry – about t
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