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CLA402H1 (4)
Lecture

Lecture 4

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Department
Classics
Course
CLA402H1
Professor
Regina Höschele
Semester
Winter

Description
Room Layout - Barquist In a standard room the kline were all along the edge of the room with the krater in the middle. The kline were 1.8-9m x .8-.9 m In a seven couch room the max that could fit were 14. If you have a much larger space (long or broad, depending on where the entrance is). How would it function as a space for a symposium? If you set it up standardly, how would you have a conversation with someone not he total opposite side of the room? Doesn’t really work. Observed that there are two hearths in these rooms, so the hypothesis was that maybe you could have smaller subgroups. Smaller groups = more symposiastic?And larger groups = more of a “public” feel? Not every household would have the space for a proper dining room. The arrangement does not create a hierarchy: none of the seats are better or worse. Compare to Rome: Triclinium: three kline In rome they were somewhat larger, so three people could fit on each couch. We have a fixed and strict arrangement for people sit. Places for honor, and those for “lesser” guests. Lectures Image 2: man holding a kline and a table on his back, bringing it to the part. We should observe that kline have fairly high legs. You are pretty high up Image 3: famous representation of oriental feast. Reasonable to assume that the habit to lay down came into Greece via the east. Only in 7th century do we gradually get representations of these kline, becoming a greek institution and custom.Ashurbanipal lived in 7th century BC and he is now famous because he had a large library and we have around 30,000 clay tablets from it on which are transmitted very important near eastern texts. He was the last really powerfulAssyrian king. He is known in later tradition as Sardanapal. Sardanapalian means decadent and luxurious (real english adj.). This has nothing at all to do with the historical person but it is the image created. In the image we see him reclining and drinking in a garden with his queen seated near him. First representation of someone feasting like this. His palace was at Nineveh. Image 4: Tomb of the Diver, Paestum, ca. 470 B.C. Southern Italy - Magna Graecia. This is a tomb with stone walls and lid and the interior walls depict a syposiastic scene, and the ceiling shows someone diving into water. Symposiastic scene: side tables, shared beds, men playing instruments, eating and drinking. Pederastic relationship on top right. Top centre image, he is spinning the kylix in a game called Kottabos: drink your wine and a little is left in the cup, then you cast the drops of wine on to some target, either something on a pool that you had to knock down with the liquid or small things swimming in the water that you had to sink. Branches under the tables: dionysiac? Suggested that each of these panels was painted by someone different becaue the styles differ. Double flute, wearing wreaths: dionysiac symbols Short walls: left: late arrivals? (procession after the symposia called komos??); right: a slave, known as pais, who fills the krater. Set up so that the long walls look toward the new arrivals The dead is part of this symposium. Gives a vision of a continual party in the afterlife. Drink life and be merry because life is short. Vessels Image 5: Kylix cup comes in different shapes Khanteros with the two ears Theali is a bowl without handles and foot scythos is another kind of cup Psykter for cooling the wine Different forms of Krateras: Volute named for their handles, column krater for handles, kalix means blossom, and the bell like a turned over bell. Massive vessels for mixing wine Amphora standard storage vessel Oinokoi: wine pouring vessel Hydria: water vessel Image 6: Ischia cup, skiffs, ca. 730-20 BC.
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