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Lecture 2

Lecture 2 - Euro Invasion.docx

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Department
East Asian Studies
Course
EAS100Y1
Professor
Sara Osenton
Semester
Winter

Description
EAS246 Lecture 2 JAN31/2013 European Invasion: The Other Barbarians - Most often called komu (redhead) or nanban - First encounter with foreigners: 3 Portuguese ships shipwrecked in 1543 (?)  It brought predecessors of rifles, which feudal lords, like Nobunaga, used to their advantage - 1543  Portuguese seeking trade accompanied by Jesuits looking to convert the Japanese - Mid-1580s  300 000 converted Japanese; usually the poor and few daimyos  Daimyos convert because they would gain access to trade goods brought by the foreign traders – “Christian by Convenience” - Oda Nobunaga used guns from foreigners while Hideyoshi was worried about the presence of foreigners  As Christians, they only believe in one Lord – a Lord that is higher than any lord (daimyo)  Hideyoshi saw it as a threat to his authority, a possible trigger for instability - Hideyoshi promulgated edicts to resolve issues of the Jesuits  Expelled the Jesuits, while the traders remain - Soon after, the Spaniards came accompanied by a new brand of missionary, the Franciscans, in addition to new trade goods - Franciscans vs. Jesuits  infighting about converts - Hideyoshi, then caught wind of a rumour that typically, missionaries comes first, followed by the colonizers  Europe sees Japan as easy targets for converts: plan  convert the people, so they’ll be easy to colonize later  Hearing this, Hideyoshi cracks down on the foreigners/missionaries  killed 26 Jesuits - 1600  700 000 Christians in Japan - Hideyoshi begins to worry that they might be a problem like the Buddhist  Initiated a ban  converts arrested and forced to recant, destroyed churches, etc.  1622  120 executed  1624  prohibits the Spanish from entering Japan  1629  thousands were executed rd  1639  under the rule of the 3 Tokugawa shogun, Iemitsu, extended the ban to Portuguese  No more religious people  Brits left Japan at this point on their own  didn’t see any prospect in staying in Japan  The only foreigner allowed to stay in Japan by the late 1930s were the Dutch  purely because they were there solely for trade; not religious - There’s still hidden sects of Christianity in Japan, these were called the karakure Christians  had secret signs or hidden religious items m
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