ENG100H1 Lecture Notes - Anagnorisis, Lyric Poetry, Metafiction

41 views4 pages
25 Jan 2013
School
Department
Course
May 7, 2012
Drama: Tragedy
Lecture 1 – Aristotle
Gwilder@chass.utoronto.ca
Participation: 10%
Short Essay 1: 15% (3-5 pages)
Short Essay 2: 25% (8 pages)
Scene Study Presentations: 15%
Final Exam: 35%
Writing Tips
Binary ideas: very simplistic ideas; good/bad
Critical writing – explore complexities of a topic
Don't use: “one might see that”
Instead do this: “Critic A says, and Critic B says this, but I will argue this....”
Don't use passive voice – use I, especially in reflective writing
Use sites that end in “edu” as sources – these are academic sources
Aristotle
For Aristotle, everything and every drama is poetry – everything is written in verse in acient
Greece
Considers drama to be one type of poetry
Also poetry has other forms/genres
Ethic poetry
Lyric poetry
Poetry
Drama
Comedy
Tragedy
*Homer
is important – no evidence as to who he/she was
2 major poems
Huge epics: Odyssey & Illiad
Many of the characters that you see in ancient drama come from Odyssey or Illiad
So these are all pre-existing characters and so audience at this point in time all have
background info
Aristotle also believed in song = music = lyrics or ideas that go with music
Also talks about dance & rhythm being part of theatre as well
All of these elements are important for drama
Western drama builds on the old
But all of this doesn't originate in ancient Greece, but in other places
Dance & rhythm originated as ritual practice
Aristotle walks you through history as to what existed first (e.g. Rhythm of poetry)
Unlock document

This preview shows page 1 of the document.
Unlock all 4 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in

Get OneClass Notes+

Unlimited access to class notes and textbook notes.

YearlyBest Value
75% OFF
$8 USD/m
Monthly
$30 USD/m
You will be charged $96 USD upfront and auto renewed at the end of each cycle. You may cancel anytime under Payment Settings. For more information, see our Terms and Privacy.
Payments are encrypted using 256-bit SSL. Powered by Stripe.