ENG100H1 Lecture Notes - Lecture 2: Vistavision, Steadicam, Anamorphic Format

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Published on 10 Apr 2013
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Hitchcock was very much about planning and making storyboards before any movie
he was a lot about control and planning before starting any action
McGuffin secrets that spies after, which seem to be of vital importance to the characters, but of no importance to
Hitchcock a Hitchcock definition
The Shape of the Frame
aspect ratio the width-to-height ratio of the film frame as it appears on a movie screen or monitor
academy ratio 1.33:1 used mainly up to the 50s; same as 4 × 3 or 16 × 9
widescreen ratio 1.85:1 or higher
o introduced in 50s, in part to compete with television (N by NW ―Vistavision‖)
o can be done with
anamorphic lens
masks covering up areas not wanting to show
The Shot
one continuous camera take (can be moving, but cannot ―cut‖ or ―edit‖ to another shot/view)
attributes of the shot: framing, depth of field (focus), colour, and movement
also: duration
Framing or Composition
distance (shot scale) how far away the camera is from the subject
o long shot
o medium long shot (or ―American shot‖)
o medium shot
o medium close up
o close up
o extreme close up
Mobile or Static Frame
mobile framing
o pan: left or right rotation of camera, tripod remains fixed
o tilt: upward or downward rotation, tripod fixed
o dolly or tracking shot: camera moved on a dolly across the floor, often along tracks
o crane: shot taken from camera mounted on crane, lifted off the floor
o hand-held, steadicam, motion control
Angles
high angle: shot from a high position, directed downward on individuals or a scene
low angle: shot from a low position, directed upward on individuals or a scene
―canted‖ angle: can appear titled, askew, unbalanced (sometimes referred to as ―dutching‖ the camera)
Who is Roger Thornhill?
classic set-up of Hitchcock films is wrong man in wrong place or wrong setting
―In advertising there’s no such thing as a lie—just expedient exaggeration‖
fan of lies, buying people off, has many girlfriends
―Goodbye Roger Thornhill, whoever you are‖ FBI wash their hands of Roger Thornhill after he is mistaken as
George Caplan
Thornhill is mistaken as Caplan when Caplan is paged in the restaurant and he raises his hand at that
Narrative and Perspective
restricted narration: a narrative in which our knowledge is limited to that of a particular character
POV (point-of-view) or subjective shots: shots that reproduce a character’s optical point of view; we are aligned with
that perspective
Hamlet
―I am but mad north-northwest; when the wind is southerly, I know a hawk from a handsaw‖ Act II, Scene II
―Though this be madness, yet there is method in it‖ Act II, Scene II
―The play’s the thing wherein I’ll catch the conscience of a king‖ Act II, Scene II
in large about lies and deception, and using a different kind of lie to get the truth out

Document Summary

Hitchcock was very much about planning and making storyboards before any movie. Mcguffin secrets that spies after, which seem to be of vital importance to the characters, but of no importance to he was a lot about control and planning before starting any action. Masks covering up areas not wanting to show anamorphic lens one continuous camera take (can be moving, but cannot cut or edit to another shot/view) attributes of the shot: framing, depth of field (focus), colour, and movement. Framing or composition also: duration long shot distance (shot scale) how far away the camera is from the subject: medium long shot (or american shot , medium shot, medium close up close up extreme close up. Who is roger thornhill? high angle: shot from a high position, directed downward on individuals or a scene low angle: shot from a low position, directed upward on individuals or a scene.