Lecture 4

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Published on 13 Feb 2011
School
UTSG
Department
English
Course
ENG215H1
Professor
ENG215
Jan.31/11
Office hour for Feb. 1: 1:15 PM-3 PM
Instructions for In-Class Passage Analysis (25 %), Feb. 7:
Write a critical analysis of the following passage. Identify the place of the passage in the
overall design of the story, and develop an argument about its specific meaning and
significance. To this end, consider how the passage develops or comments on larger themes
or issues within the story. As part of this close reading, analyze the passages specific
features including any relevant stylistic, technical, or structural elements, (including
languages, phrases, tropes, imagery, symbols, motifs, elements of grammar or punctuation)
and explain the way they work together to shape and convey meaning.
Strive to develop a clear and focused thesis, and check that this thesis or argument develops
in a logical and coherent manner. The essay should contain an introductory paragraph,
supporting paragraphs, and a conclusion; ensure that these paragraphs are well-developed,
unified, and that they follow a natural progression. Securely ground your analysis in the
working of the passage itself. Quote from the passage to support and illustrate your claims,
and make sure that quotations are properly set up and contextualized, and well-
integrated into the body of your essay. Grammar, punctuation, and spelling should also be
correct.
Please write double-space and in legible pen or pencil.
Note that this is a closed-book test. No aids allowed.
Can comment on other parts of the story but focus on the passage given
Dont relate the passage with the other stories; just discuss the passage given
Rigmarole
(Profs) Concluding thoughts ---
Difference for Callaghans story: difference between showing and telling central to
most of the modernist writers
Purist form of showing is the quoted speech of the characters in which language
exactly mirrors the evens and the purist form of telling is authorial summary in
which the
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What we see in this story is the authors attempt to infuse the authorial speech and
character speech (his characters think and communicate in Rigmarole); reported
speech in third-person, to the kind of vocabulary that is appropriate to the
characters
Gives an illusion of intimate access to the characters’ mind
Also contributes to Jeff and Mathildes isolation from each other and their failure to
communicate heightened isolation and separation disconnect what one
character says and what one character thinks and the distance between Jeff and
Mathilde more generally modernist attempt to explore the alienation and
isolation and also the technique of the author of infusing of showing and telling
(narrator has more intimate access to characters thoughts)
(pg. 79) questions for thought in relation to this passage: this story is largely told
from Jeffs perspective:
Do we accept Jeffs way of seeing things? At what point does authority appear and why?
Power struggle between men and women; what did manhood mean at this time in
urban North America and how did this affect Jeff and Mathilde?
The idea of freedom plays a complicated role in the story
Compare the way the male and female roles have played in stories like Callaghan
Robert Weaver:
- growth and development of short Canadian stories is due to the efforts made by Robert
Weaver
- his career in CBC (radio programs) and other activities in literature
- as early as 1951, Weaver is credited by discovering the works by Alice Laylaw Alice
Monroe
- 1966: creation of journal called the Tamarac Review by Weaver
- in addition to his preference to Canadian Short Stories in 1978, allowed himself to
personal reflections
Mavis Gallant:
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- grew up in Montreal and mostly lived in Paris during her adulthood life
- published her writing in U.S. and went unnoticed until the 1970s
- in 1981, assumed a more sure place in Canadian literature
- many of the settings in her stories are set in Montreal and Winnipeg
- she occupies an important position in English Canadian short fiction
- characteristics of her writing: tight-wit ironic realism, depiction in the family as a place
little protection in the world, etc.
- recurring themes …: difficulty of communication, disappointments brought on by
misguided expectations, heartbreaks that result in inability to reach indifferences, etc.
- difficult issues and questions are the reasons why we have literature and philosophy
My Heart is Broken”---
Contemporary understanding of statistics surrounding sexual assault and rape
Her story is equally committed to challenging some of the misconceptions
surrounding sexual assaults
Mrs. Thompson insists that Jeannie is the one who caused the incident to occur by
wearing provocative clothing, high heels, perfume, etc.
Mrs. Thompson says Jeannie shouldnt have reported the rape to Mr. Herman
This story emerges out of Gallants desire of seeing something that is troubling and
putting this into a fictional point of view
The opening paragraph gives us an interesting way of her strategy important
details/references that represent dominant themes the author develops in the rest of
the story:
- Jeannie/Jean Harlow double-ness of names; connected to Jean Harlow (symbol of
Hollywood glam and beauty)
- Cutex (Cute + Sex) Jeannie gets symbols of objectified female of sex symbol; sanitized
reference to sex; confusing to Jeannie
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Document Summary

Office hour for feb. 1: 1:15 pm-3 pm. Instructions for in-class passage analysis (25 %), feb. 7: Write a critical analysis of the following passage. Identify the place of the passage in the overall design of the story, and develop an argument about its specific meaning and significance. To this end, consider how the passage develops or comments on larger themes or issues within the story. Strive to develop a clear and focused thesis, and check that this thesis or argument develops in a logical and coherent manner. The essay should contain an introductory paragraph, supporting paragraphs, and a conclusion; ensure that these paragraphs are well-developed, unified, and that they follow a natural progression. Securely ground your analysis in the working of the passage itself. Quote from the passage to support and illustrate your claims, and make sure that quotations are properly set up and contextualized, and well- integrated into the body of your essay.