Class Notes (839,327)
Canada (511,270)
English (1,425)
ENG140Y1 (118)
Nick Mount (76)
Lecture

Eng140 Sylvia Plath Lecture 2

4 Pages
74 Views

Department
English
Course Code
ENG140Y1
Professor
Nick Mount

This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full 4 pages of the document.
Description
Eng140 Lecture November 30, 2012 ­ music and poetry come from the same family tree ­ both lyric poetry and popular music tend to move away from ordinary language  towards languages and sounds of their own making ­ the language that we use to get by in daily life doesn't suffice, it isn't adequate to the  kinds of discoveries a lyric makes ­ lyric poems often use words/phrases/sounds that we don't usually use in daily speech ­ poetry and music often repeats words and phrases far more than we do in normal life ­ lyric poems often exploit sound to create the new language that they're trying to speak ­ no art more powerful than sound, than music when it comes to emotion ­ rhyme, rhythm, words from other language or from no language at all ­ the set of circumstances that precede a lyric is that some experience has exceeded the  ability of the speaker to deal with it and speak about it in a normal way ­­> you can't say  it directly so you say in indirectly ­ one of the most powerful tools for indirect expression is sound Daddy ­ written for the ear, not the eye ­ hearing it aloud ­­> darker ­ the "oo" sound is more aggressive out loud, more accusing ­ hearing it makes it real ­ the rhythm of the poem sounds like a nursery rhyme ­ it has a sing­song sort of rhythm to it ­ why did she write it this way? ­ psychologically ­­> the father died early, the speaker is still his little girl ­ literary ­­> the rhythm provides an ironic counterpoint to dominant mood ­ tension between emotion of anger and sound and rhythm of nursery rhyme ­ written in free­verse but many rhymes ­ almost impossible to convey extreme emotions (anger, etc.) in a strict form of poetry ­ free­verse is appropriate to her content ­ begins from the starting point of an activity ­ a blocked activity ­ something she cannot  do ­ forget her father/put him to rest/bury him ­ the second line changes this ­ this is how it was, but it won't be that way anymore ­ "I have had to kill you" ­­> she has to do it and keep on doing it every day because she  never had the chance to kill him as a child...she never got the chance to outgrow him  like other children do ­ children need to separate themselves from their parents in order to become  autonomous ­­> Plath's problem is that s he was never able to separate herself from her  father ­ what she was denied in her life she had to enact metaphorically in her poems over and  over again ­ this is a heavy burden that she has been dragging around all her life ­ because of her father's death, she lost her connection to the past ­ she doesn't know her father's origins ­ she can't even find the town that he came from ­ she knows she is of German heritage but she can't even say the word "I" in German ­ she doesn't fit with the German sentence, but her father does ­ she feels trapped ­ she identifies her father with Hitler (?) ­ she tries to replace him with her husband ­ she discovers the affair ­ the ending fulfills the promise of the first stanza of the poem ­ the speaker has killed   her father ­ she has made the undead dead ­ she is finally through with words ­ she is through with him ­ nothing more to say to  him ­ she is through to him ­ her voice made the connection from the land of the living to the  land of the dead ­ she is through with life as well ­ she kills herself five months later ­ Plath herself said that the father in the poem is a Nazi, but Plath's father is not ­ there are strains of truth in it, but it is not purely autobiographical ­ the poem is her life turned into art ­ Electra complex ­ Plath wrote this poem to respond to her life, not to record it ­ she also wrote it to respond to art ­ this is a traditional poem, in that it engages with and revises the tradition that came  before it ­ the main rhetorical device in the poem is called apostrophe ­ a direct address made by  a speaker to someone who is absent or abstract ­ often used in eulogies ­ In an eulogy, the main function of apostrophe is to connect the living with the dead ­ the big difference is that in typical eulogies, the poem is meant to praise the audience,  whereas in Plath's poem she is not praising her father ­ she has brought him back from  the dead to kill him in her own way and on her own terms ­ she is not trying to keep him alive, bu
More Less
Unlock Document

Only page 1 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit