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Lecture

gospelofmark.docx

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Department
English
Course Code
ENG150Y1
Professor
William Robins

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Literary Tradition – November 28h GOSPEL OF MARK (Lecture 2)  Concept of God-Man circulated throughout ancient world (Rama, Augustus) as well as Son of God (Achilles son of Thetis, Aeneas Son of Venus, Gilgamesh son of Ninsun) not unique to Christianity  Figure of Jesus inverts God-Man concept, comes from humble background as opposed to being a King  Divine order no longer underpins the exercise of power – Monotheism is rejection of Polytheistic Imperial logic  Mark’s story is that of expectations being frustrated  Very different narrative end – story not going to end with great military victory, but rather defeat/death/humiliation/abandonment  Social norms existent in ancient world o Rejection that true order is created through violence (Odysseus killing suitors, etc.) o Forgiveness instead of violence to maintain order in society (Love God, love neighbour)  The sign of defeat in Christianity is symbolized by crucifixion  When man asks Jesus how to be part of eternal kingdom, tells him to give up worldly possessions  Withdrawal from the world o "Render to Caesar, render to God…” coins belong to the world from which Jesus is askig
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