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Lecture 4

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University of Toronto St. George
Sarah Caskey

ENG215 Jan.3111 Office hour for Feb. 1: 1:15 PM-3 PM Instructions for In-Class Passage Analysis (25 %), Feb. 7: Write a critical analysis of the following passage. Identify the place of the passage in the overall design of the story, and develop an argument about its specific meaning and significance. To this end, consider how the passage develops or comments on larger themes or issues within the story. As part of this close reading, analyze the passages specific features including any relevant stylistic, technical, or structural elements, (including languages, phrases, tropes, imagery, symbols, motifs, elements of grammar or punctuation) and explain the way they work together to shape and convey meaning. Strive to develop a clear and focused thesis, and check that this thesis or argument develops in a logical and coherent manner. The essay should contain an introductory paragraph, supporting paragraphs, and a conclusion; ensure that these paragraphs are well-developed, unified, and that they follow a natural progression. Securely ground your analysis in the working of the passage itself. Quote from the passage to support and illustrate your claims, and make sure that quotations are properly set up and contextualized, and well- integrated into the body of your essay. Grammar, punctuation, and spelling should also be correct. Please write double-space and in legible pen or pencil. Note that this is a closed-book test. No aids allowed. Can comment on other parts of the story but focus on the passage given Dont relate the passage with the other stories; just discuss the passage given Rigmarole (Profs) Concluding thoughts --- Difference for Callaghans story: difference between showing and telling central to most of the modernist writers Purist form of showing is the quoted speech of the characters in which language exactly mirrors the evens and the purist form of telling is authorial summary in which the
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