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Lecture 8

Lecture 8 - 131002.doc

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Department
English
Course
ENG323H1
Professor
Deidre Lynch
Semester
Fall

Description
Lecture 8 – 131002 Last class, we finished with Vol. 3, ch. 1 of P+P – important turning point in drama of knowledge - Why does her change of mind happen in front of a portrait? - In western culture, we tend to think that P+P is the love story - Vol. 3, ch. 1: Greenfield says that they’re replacing the ‘original’ Darcy with her own idea of them, Elizabeth Bennet makes a man, as if she was the painter  Touching up the mental image of Darcy in her mind as she sees this actual physical image of him  Greenfield says that that command is only possible because Darcy isn’t there with Elizabeth  Absence makes the heart grow fonder, in particularly in gender terms  Male absence in a prerequisite for love  Elizabeth seems to want this real kind of love, apart from the social circumstances  She can’t gaze at Darcy the same way he gazes at her  ‘Original’ Darcy is the portrait because it’s from when his father was still alive and since his death, Darcy has changed  When Darcy’s away, it’s easier for Elizabeth to let her guard down - Vol. 3, ch. 1: “…Elizabeth turned back to look at it again…”  The whole timing of the novel is important for Elizabeth and Darcy’s happy ending – Austen incorporates the timing of their reunion as a matter of chance  If she didn’t go back to look at the portrait, she wouldn’t have run into the real Darcy  There is a way in which Austen invites us as readers that she’s courting improbability - Vol. 3, ch. 8: “The wish of procuring her regard…such a blow as this.” And the scene where Darcy helps out with Lydia’s situation.  Twice the narrator says that it is not probable for the main characters to reunite but Austen sets up a storyline that defies probability - Vol. 3, ch. 8: “As a brother, as a landlord…”  Free indirect discourse – the narrator has handed the narration to Elizabeth’s thoughts – she’s thinking of Darcy’s power  Austen reminds us that Elizabeth had been thinking those thoughts when she changes her mind about Darcy  Vol. 3, ch. 17: “Her love for Darcy must be dated…”  She doesn’t want to marry money but she’s joking about the fact that she fell in love with him because of his house  It’s his money that allows him to save Lydia  Emphasis of power isn’t an accident because it’s the subplot involving Lydia which Austen uses as a means to demonstrate what his power can do  Austen is asking some difficult and touchy questions about the place of gratitude in a woman’s place in loving a man  Elizabeth is grateful to Darcy - Vol. 3, ch. 10: “It was painful, exceedingly painful…”  Elizabeth is half-afraid that Darcy really did have something to do with Lydia’s
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