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GGR221H1 (54)
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Department
Geography
Course
GGR221H1
Professor
Ben Spigel
Semester
Summer

Description
 Wedgwood and Making machines of men  Wedgwood kept diving the production into more and more specialist labour with less skilled , cheaper labour  Josiah Wedgwood’s effort to standardize the production of pots by splitting the production process into smaller and smaller tasks is a process known as the division of labour  Adam Smith and the division of labour  Dexterity of employees improves and this contributes to an increase in speed  Time is lost when an employee has to change from one type of work to another  Machines permitting cheaper and faster production can replace labour  Spatial division of labour  One location is used for the HQ, another for research and development  This spatial division of labour began with manufacturers establishing speciali st units that were contiguously located, but soon developed into a more dispe rsed spatial division of labour.  Different parts of the production process were located close to either sources of raw materials, cheap labour or the market place  Fordism  Ford pioneered the development of mass production based on assembly line techniques and the introduction of scientific management into the workplace.  He also encouraged mass consumption through advertising, higher wages and the supply of relatively inexpensive products.  Mass production cannot occur without mass marketing to encourage mass consumption  First, in the 1880s, meat-packing became the first assembly-line industry as it proved to be impossible to mechanize the production process.  Second, as the populations of American cities increased it became impossible for each city to rely on local meat supplies.  A transportation innovation resulted in a new spatial division of labour, with Chicago developing a specialism in the production and supply of meat produ cts.  Most economic geographies of Fordism begin with Henry Ford's development of the Model T motor car, the first successful mass-produced car. Fordism, the production system named after Henry Ford, was a combination of: 1.The extended d
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