Class Notes (836,253)
Canada (509,718)
Geography (975)
GGR241H1 (22)
Lecture 3

Week 3 Lecture - Coketown: The Industrial City in Europe

4 Pages
88 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Geography
Course
GGR241H1
Professor
Robert Lewis
Semester
Winter

Description
Capitalist Industrialization  • Origins lie in the proto­industralization (1650 to early 1800s) which centered on  the small, rural­based units that were operated by city merchants  • Growing increase in production of things outside of the control of the household  • Development of small firms with employees using primitive hand tools creating  profit for owner of firm ­ controlled by merchants  ◦ Firstly, growing spatial control of consumer market  ◦ Rise of ports as important places  ◦ Reordering of everyday life for rural people that used to work on farms  now finding jobs in factories ­ basis for full­scale industrialization  • Rise of the United Kingdom to industrial prominence between 1750 and 1880  (created by capitalist dynamic) ­ colonization major factor  • Before 1880 major manufacturing done mostly in modern day China and India  (mostly handicraft)  • Germany, U.K., US become powerhouses while China, India, and Japan decline  • Control of production is how West became prominent  Time­space Compression • D. Harvey: “annihilates space through time”  • Shrinking time horizons  • Speeds up capitalist investment  Wealth, Trade and Investment • Warehouses (as in Manchester) and coffee shops (as in Paris) were centres of  trade, information, capital investment, social connection and wealth formation   Proletariat and New Power Hierarchy      • Disposable labor: sell labor power  • Class structure: based on industry  • Capitalist ideology: market individualism  • Wage labor force ­ moving from countryside to city and become proletariat  employed by new industrial class  • Three class structure: 60­80% of it being proletariat • Rags to riches: social mobility possible if you do the right things in this new  economy  Science and Technology • Innovation  • Industry  • Diffusion  • Technologies in factory and workplace: steam engine  Growing State Control in Urban Affairs     • Cities exhibit greater interest in and control over urban and industrial growth  • Central government made railroad and street building possible  • State had to become increasingly interventionist in building cities  Modern Circulation System • Emergence of 2 or 3 important circulatory systems • Canals open up the regional and national economies  • Railroad extends the pattern and the benefits: faster and cheaper than canals  The Capitalist City • Potteries: centre of manufacturing of pottery  • Representative of Western European cities by late 19th century  • 8 Commonalities  1. Manufacturing is the driver of growth  2. Cities are extremely specialized  3. Linked through a variety of different transportation centres  4. Experiencing large scale population growth  5. Wide variety of housing but much of it extremely poor and in terrible  conditions  6. Daily life was centred around factory  7. Degraded environment  8. Intense forms of regulation by the state, factory owners, religious leaders  and by bureaucracies  • Large­scale building plus industrialization ­> industrial cities  • New built environment on a new scale  • Private and segmented housing ­ state not involved in production of housing (only  after 1920s­1930s)  1. geared for middle and higher class and lack of decent housing for mass of  people that cannot afford it in private housing market: key crisis • Most land taken up with housing  • Everyday life dominated by the factory and the clock (industrial time) ­ Time  Discipline ­ segmented, controlled that now people’s lives are down to the minute  • Use of time under industrial capitalism was quite different from that found in pre­ industrial agriculture or workshop manufacturing (proto­industrial) societies  • Pre­industrial: clock and time not important, much more organic process which  was linked to everyday lives in ways that were linked to the rising and setting of  the sun, changing of seasons  •  Poor Environmental Conditions  1. such as extremely polluted air and water, the lack of sewers, good quality
More Less

Related notes for GGR241H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit