Class Notes (836,324)
Canada (509,733)
Geography (975)
GGR327H1 (27)
Lecture 9

LECTURE 9.docx

4 Pages
55 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Geography
Course
GGR327H1
Professor
Deborah Leslie
Semester
Fall

Description
22 November 2010 Community, exclusion and the new urbanism  A) exclusionary in terms of race - Community is always excluded and included with people; today community is very diverse in terms of class, race, and physical forms. - Markovich and Hendler(2006): Cornell; Markham : compared to Markham as a whole: more white : more exclusionary than traditional suburbs : notion of diversity can create a bond between neighbours but it can also create exclusionary  B) exclusionary in terms of class - Talen (2010) vast majority of new urbanist projects in the US are not within the reach of middle and low-income families - Only 15 percent of were affordable to someone making an Area Median Income - Cornell: found that higher percentage of university graduates than Markham; suggest a correlation between graduates and income - McCann: geographer who suggests that new urbanism linked to class distinction - Individual distinguishes themselves from the others by the consumption patterns - New middle class distinguishes themselves from the traditional middle class. In effort to distinguishes themselves, they had to change their consumption patterns (life style) - House part of symbolic capital- gives owners a sense of respectability, difference - New urbanism: an elite family environment that differentiates new middle class from ordinary suburban residents - Harey (2000); new urbanism may take suburbs better places to live; however, it does nothing to revitalise decaying urban areas - Abandons and excludes urban underclass; focuses on tastes, and creates greenfield sites for affluent, ignores other scales - Nostalgic and spatially limited; addressing the past rather than hearing the presents  C) The gender politics of the new urbanism - Meant to challenge dysfunctional family of suburbs - Langdon says new urbanism is positive for him because it established a more ‘family- oriented way of life’ based on ‘togetherness; - According to Falconer Al Hindi and Staddon, neotraditonal planning supports the view that women and children belong in safe protected communities’ - Ads for Seaside depict heterosexual paterttns and children - Foundnenvident of “outsize” families, stay at home moms - But some diversity in family from, and dual incomes necessary in most cases - Ross argues new urban design aims to make women’s lives easier - To ensure that suburban women are no longer chauffeurs, prisoners of subdivisions with no amenities, services or work - Daycare, schools within walking distance - Kinder on women’s’ schedules - This compact post suburban town designed to reinforce ‘family bonds’ but it does so by trying to make women’s lives easier - women not interested in close amenities, mostly drive, few opportunities to uphold feminist planning principles  Conservative or progressive?  Conclusion - Contemporary anxiety causes multiple reactions, including longing for traditional forms of community th - Nostalgia for between Early 20 century or middle century working class community - Like all forms of community, new urbanism exclusionary - Neotraditonalism stems from utopian impulse that is also authoritarian - Changing the space can be the problematic notion against modernist - Jane Jacobs preserves inner city of community - In order to be truly urban, places requires a degree of ‘out-of controlness’ and a genuinely diverse from of city life where groups live together without forming single ‘community’ - Instead of bucolic or imaginary past, urban design would celebrate the strange the novel - Create spaces for encountering difference rather than affirming sameness - Utopianism can be negative; ideal community RACE, CLASS, GENDER AND THE STATE OF EXCEPTION: THE CASE OF DOMESTIC WORK  Focus on difficulties women have combining home and work responsibilities  Increasing employment of nannies and cleaners  Un
More Less

Related notes for GGR327H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit