Lecture 9-March 12-The Geography of Demand Lecture 10-March19-Murdies Social Area Model

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5 Aug 2010
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Lecture 9: March 12
The Geography of Demand: The Market
(A market is a set of consumers)
How do we usually identify and describe a market?
1. Spatially: bounding a spatial market. Where? What limits? Demands and distance.
2. Population size: numbers, distribution, and density. Population change.
Fig 17.3, CMAs, Fig 6.8 ± Intra urban population density has distance decay effect from
downtown. The core is not high density because this area is business area now. High density
around CBD (core business district).
Population change: P2 = P1 +(B - D) + (I - E)
3. Socioeconomic status: income, education, occupation, FAMEX data (income brackets ± how they
spend money).
Table 8.6: inner city ± lower income but contradiction is forest hill and rosedale
Suburbs ± higher income
Sector pattern, Fig 2.7, 2.8
Education and income
Occupation
High: highly skilled/managerial/professional, white collar
Middle: skilled/semi skilled, blue collar
Low: unskilled
Above note is continued in next lecture
Lecture 10: March 19
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Fig 6.4
Family status in inner city: child free, adult oriented.
Table 5.3 shows less than 40% are mom, dad, child. Nearly 25% of households are single person
(younger adults). Great diversity in composition of households.
4. Demographics: age, sex, lifecycle. Population pyramids.
Generalizations of pyramid: males are biologically vulnerable (chromosomes) and males do
stupid things so males die off earlier.
Population pyramids can be used in two ways:
x Can look at the past (ie absence of births due to wars). Can see baby booms (if contraction of
baby boom then baby bust becaXVHEDE\ERRPGLGQWUHSURGXFHWKHPVHOYHV(FKRNLGVDUH
smaller booms.
x Can be used as predictive models.
After certain years, the number of people in age groups is not the same because of deaths,
immigration/emigration.
To Predict change in Demographic (age/sex) Composition
x Age specific death rates by sex.
x Age specific in migration by sex
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Document Summary

The geography of demand: the market (a market is a set of consumers) How do we usually identify and describe a market: spatially: bounding a spatial market. Demands and distance: population size: numbers, distribution, and density. Fig 17. 3, cmas, fig 6. 8 intra urban population density has distance decay effect from downtown. The core is not high density because this area is business area now. Population change: p2 = p1 +(b - d) + (i - e: socioeconomic status: income, education, occupation, famex data (income brackets how they spend money). Table 8. 6: inner city lower income but contradiction is forest hill and rosedale. Family status in inner city: child free, adult oriented. Table 5. 3 shows less than 40% are mom, dad, child. Nearly 25% of households are single person (younger adults). Great diversity in composition of households: demographics: age, sex, lifecycle.

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