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Lecture 13

HIS109Y1 Lecture 13: Realightment of Europe


Department
History
Course Code
HIS109Y1
Professor
Kenneth Bartlett
Lecture
13

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(Lecture 13) Realignment of Europe
The Renaissance provided Italy enormous wealth, given its ability to provide silk and linen
across the continent.
As long as trade was secure and brought profit, the south benefited greatly.
And trade was secure because of banking and the insurance and construction
of ships as part of trade in the Mediterranean Coast.
This however, changed with 1453.
The Ottoman Empire's Siege of Europe
In 1453, two things occurred.
1. The Hundred Year War came to an end.
The Northern States could then revert their focus to unifying their military
energy and do away with Feudalism entirely.
2. The fall of the City of Constantinople.
Built by Emperor Constantine, it was a Christian City of orthodox, sadly taken
by the Turks.
Captured citizens were meant with various demands by the Turks, such
as greater taxes.
Trade was far too dangerous now in reaching Constantinople,
leaving alternatives to be found and the city abandoned.
With the expansion of Islam by the Turks, the Church and Turks became two political forces
clashing with one another, each in attempt of claiming the Mediterranean for purpose of
trade.
War in turn begun between Europe and the Ottoman Empire.
The Ottomans on their part, lead by Mohammad II, furthered their conquest,
seizing Western cities one by one.
The Balkans proved a large extension of Ottoman power.
And by 1480-81, a Turkish Fleet seized the city of Otranto, leaving
Europe in absolute panic with the rising forces of the Ottomans.
At this point, the Mediterranean became a Turkish lake, filled of
pirates funded by the Ottomans to drive away Europeans.
With these constant clashes in Europe, it is sensible why then that Martin Luther, among
others, became such a pleasing figure to so many.
These dynamics posed the corruption of the Church, of God's lost faith now.
By 1529, the Turks, having captured many cities, reached as far as Vienna.
However, Vienna was fortunately saved by means of supply and control.
And then in the island of Molta, knights engaged in a heroic, suicidal defense
that proved effective against the Turks as well.
And again with the Battle of Lepanto, the Christians drove the Turks
away in a fierce naval battle.
Searching for Trade Elsewhere
Europe was desperate for another route to the East, void of trending through the
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