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HIS263Y1 (268)
Mc Kim (26)
Lecture

Creating Permanent European Outposts

5 Pages
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Department
History
Course Code
HIS263Y1
Professor
Mc Kim

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HIS263YChristianity, Commerce and the Development of New France Thursday
September 23rd 2010
The Fur Trade & the Development of New World France
As a result of the cod fishing industry, it became normal for Europeans to travel
throughout the continent and participate in trade
Fur trade emerges, in the late 1500s, garments made of fur-bearing animals and
especially wide-brimmed hats were highly fashionable in European society
Partly because they were warm and because they had a luxurious feel and texture,
fetching them high prices
As a result, Europeans and especially the French, become actively involved in the fur
trade
European involvement in this industry resulted in French traders being integrated
into a vast network of trade relationships
This network was concentrated in the valley of the St. Lawrence river
Series of groups involved in this vast network of trade, French relying on
relationships they had made with various aboriginal groups, trapping the furs and
bringing them to this emerging French settlement in the St. Lawrence river in
return for French-manufactured goods
Involvement in this fur trade and extensive trade network is fundamentally
important to the development of a French colonial presence in the New World, what
would come to be known as New France
Samuel de Champlain
Important to the development of New France in the 1700s
By training a soldier, a mariner, naturalist (fascinated by natural world), functions
as a politician
Serves as the de facto Governor of New France
Makes his first voyage to the New World in 1603
Dies in 1635
In between those two dates, he criss-crosses the Atlantic 24 times
www.notesolution.com
HIS263YChristianity, Commerce and the Development of New France Thursday
September 23rd 2010
In the early 17th century, France was very much interested in establishing a base
from which it could realize its imperial ambitions, in particular it could assert and
consolidate its control over the fur trade
Champlains dream: One day, New France would rival and possible surpass France
itself in terms of population, wealth, and military/political interests.
This dream has two essential/interrelated components
1.Economical: Exploitation of fur stocks
2.Religious: Spreading Christianity throughout North America
Has implications on not just the small number of French settlers living in the New
World, but also the Aboriginal Peoples
Champlain envisions large scale missionary activity and large-scale conversion,
intermarriage,
This is central to Champlains vision.. .winning them over and absorbing them into
French culture
Port Royal, 1604; Acadia
First French settlement in the New World
Champlain participates in this settlement
The larger region, including modern maritime provinces and Maine, was named by
the French Acadia
Despite this establishment, they dont choose to make this a long-term base as it was
too far from the St. Lawrence
Essentially abandoned and wouldnt be developed until 1630s never a focal point in
the French attempt to control and colonize the North American continent
Quebec, 1608
www.notesolution.com

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Description
HIS263Y Christianity, Commerce and the Development of New France Thursday September 23 2010 The Fur Trade & the Development of New World France As a result of the cod fishing industry, it became normal for Europeans to travel throughout the continent and participate in trade Fur trade emerges, in the late 1500s, garments made of fur-bearing animals and especially wide-brimmed hats were highly fashionable in European society Partly because they were warm and because they had a luxurious feel and texture, fetching them high prices As a result, Europeans and especially the French, become actively involved in the fur trade European involvement in this industry resulted in French traders being integrated into a vast network of trade relationships This network was concentrated in the valley of the St. Lawrence river Series of groups involved in this vast network of trade, French relying on relationships they had made with various aboriginal groups, trapping the furs and bringing them to this emerging French settlement in the St. Lawrence river in return for French-manufactured goods Involvement in this fur trade and extensive trade network is fundamentally important to the development of a French colonial presence in the New World, what would come to be known as New France Samuel de Champlain Important to the development of New France in the 1700s By training a soldier, a mariner, naturalist (fascinated by natural world), functions as a politician Serves as the de facto Governor of New France Makes his first voyage to the New World in 1603 Dies in 1635 In between those two dates, he criss-crosses the Atlantic 24 times www.notesolution.com
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