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Lecture

Notes taken during lecture


Department
Linguistics
Course Code
LIN229H1
Professor
Rohany- Rahbar

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LECTURE Feb. 9/2011
Palatalization and affrication how different?
-Different processes but overlap
-Affrication occurs when targets stops (coronal)
oTriggers: high vowels, glides
-Palatalization
oTargets: consonants of all manners and places
Most common are velars, k and g
oTriggers: front vowels and glides
oApplied to stop produces affricate
Where the two processes overlap
-Page 117 t, l -> t, j with s superscript afterwards / _w
oCalled affrication
Lecture material
[m], for instance
- not exactly the same in all languages
Same phoneme, but not same phonetic property that another language has…not
necessarily, at least
-Subtle phonetic differences not relevant to phonology
-Only if phonetic differences show contrast then relevant to phonology
In Kimatuumbi, tense and lax [i] is contrastive; same for English
-HOWEVER, never consider the contrast or lack thereof between lax English
[i]and lax Kimatuumbi [i]
oThis contrast does not exist
-Phonetically written differently
oThese fine differences do not matter in phonology
Phonology about observation AND Prediction
-Why does these sounds (instead of something else) exist?
oWhy cant get these sounds? These sound combinations?
Rules should seem natural
-Need to account for rule with a category, or a natural class, etc.
Phonology picks small group of features to define segments…
-These are DISTINCTIVE features
WE WILL USE ODDENs FEATURES
-Three major features: syllabic, sonorant, consonantal
oFirst cut in any entry between vowels and consonants
-Glottal stops ARE SONORANT and MINUS CONSONANTAL
www.notesolution.com
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