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MUS110H1 Lecture 2 Meter 10-12-07 2:06 AM
Thursday, September 30, 2010
Pulsatile a recognizable beat (i.e. your pulse)
Non- pulsatile no perceptible, equally measurable beat
Pulse has an equally recurrent stress
Meter has a stress on a certain note
Polymeter more than one meter at a time
Attitude meter irregular
Melody
A series of tones or pitches arranged in succession [to form a
recognizable or perceived unity]
What do we look and listen for in a melody?
o range and length of the melody
o conjunct or disjunct motion
o contour and overall shape of the melody
o regular and recurrent patterns or motives
o structural emphasis
o the relationship of melody to rhythm/metre
o harmonic implications through arpeggiation or chromatic
movement
Countess of Dia, “I Must Sing” (ca. 1175)
o conjunct
o narrow range
o almost no accidentals
Henry Percell, Dido and Aeneas (1689), Recitative “Thy hand,
Belinda!
o melodic shape (gradual, descending melody)
o very conjunct
o harmonic implications
Robert Schumann, Scenes from Childhood (1838)
o Big range
o Disjunct
o Variety, with consistency (in terms of its decline)
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Medieval
i.e. Countess of Dia, I Must Sing (ca. 1175)
o predominantly conjunct motion
o narrow range, staying within the octave
o almost total absence of added accidentals
Rennaissance
i.e. Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, Sanctus of the Mass: Eternal
Gifts of Christ (1590)
o mostly conjunct motion
o narrow range
o similar qualities to medieval music (however the melodies are
metric, rhythmic and you hear more than one melody at a
time)
o fairly consistent
o measured music, but no stress added to it
Baroque
A) idiomatic instrumental writing
o Idiomatic written for a specific instrument
o i.e. J.S. Bach, “Prelude”, suite No. 6 in D major for Cello (ca.
1720)
! very wide range
! very complex
! sometimes very arpeggiated and sometimes very
conjunct
! very metric
o i.e. Antonio Vivaldi, Violin Concerto in E Major, “The Spring”,
First movement (early 1700s)
! disjunct
B) idiomatic vocal writing
o Recitative writing (spoken speech)
o i.e. Claudio Monteverdi, LOrfeo, Act II, Recitative and Arioso
(1607)
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Document Summary

Pulsatile a recognizable beat (i. e. your pulse) Non- pulsatile no perceptible, equally measurable beat. Meter has a stress on a certain note. Polymeter more than one meter at a time. 1175: conjunct, narrow range, almost no accidentals, henry percell, dido and aeneas (1689), recitative thy hand, Belinda! : melodic shape (gradual, descending melody, very conjunct, harmonic implications, robert schumann, scenes from childhood (1838, big range, disjunct, variety, with consistency (in terms of its decline) www. notesolution. com. Medieval i. e. countess of dia, i must sing (ca. 1175: predominantly conjunct motion, narrow range, staying within the octave, almost total absence of added accidentals. Rennaissance i. e. giovanni pierluigi da palestrina, sanctus of the mass: eternal. Baroque: a) idiomatic instrumental writing, idiomatic written for a specific instrument i. e. j. s.  sometimes very arpeggiated and sometimes very conjunct.  very metric i. e. antonio vivaldi, violin concerto in e major, the spring ,

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