NEW240Y1 Lecture Notes - Racialization, Canadian Identity

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9 Feb 2014
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January 23, 2014Racialization of Space: Part Two
oRace: associated with both place and space (Jane and Finch, South Side
Chicago etc.), constructed by racist municipal policies. All of this is erased
when space is racialized. It is assumed that race merely exists there,
naturally – rather than through social, political, and economic constructions
and debilitations.
oViolence is then mapped onto these “spaces” - racialized bodies begin to be
imagined as criminal, diseased, unworthy of society.
oColonial mode of thinking (refer to Razack and the murder of Pamela
George). How are violent identities formed? How is the racial construction
of Canada perceived?
oThingification: Equalling colonization. Reducing people to “things”, non-
person status. Aboriginals, perceived as less than human. This process
occurs as racialization equates to thingification. Renders marginalized
people as those who are marked for inferiority. They become invisible and
disposable.
oHistorical context: erasure of history that underpins racialization.
oClean land/identity: Europe. Non-racialized bodies (white, male).
oIslamaphobia discourse: alien values that attempt to sully “our” identities.
Racist ideologies that have attempted to construct those of the East, or
religious extremists, as primitive and alien.
Group of Seven (paintings): What is missing from these paintings which depict
Canadian landscape? “Stormy Weather” by Fredrick Varley.
These paintings have become synonymous with Canadian identity, as
sacred to Canada’s history and ontological being. What are they missing?
Lack of diversification. Fails to reflect history (World War I), no human
bodies, lack of urban landscape and/or trade. Who are the subjects of
these paintings?
Paintings absent of genocide, racial cleansing, blood, Residential
schools, etc.
Paintings symbolic of: systemic violence and historical amnesia.
Pamela George:
oRacial, heterosexual, masculine violence towards an Aboriginal
woman.
oWhen history is forgotten (social relations etc.), it appears “natural”.
oThe erasure of racial ghettoization, violence against women etcetera
seems “natural” once more.
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