Class Notes (836,147)
Canada (509,656)
Philosophy (1,521)
PHL240H1 (52)
T.J.Berry (11)
Lecture

Mind Theory (Parfit).docx

8 Pages
111 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHL240H1
Professor
T.J.Berry
Semester
Summer

Description
1 MIND THEROY Parfit “the fear not of near but of distant death, the regret that so much of one's only life should have gone by-these are not, I think, wholly natural or instinctive. They are all strengthened by the beliefs about personal identity which I have been attacking. If we give up these beliefs, they should be weakened.” ­ preserves something of Locke’s view (that the mind is more central to personal identity  than the body), while avoiding the troubles  Case 1: B’s Brain in another body Resulting person has B’s character & apparent memories of his life.   ▯intuitively, B is the new person Case 2: B’s ½ brain destroyed.               Resulting person has ….  ▯intuitively, B is still in his own body. Case 3: B’s ½ brain destroyed; ½ brain in new body Resulting person has… Where’s Brown? Since he survived the transplant in #1 & ½ brain destruction in #2  ▯he’s in the new body. Case 4: Replace P’s brain with ½ of B’s brain. Replace G’s brain with other ½ of B’s brain. Both resulting people have B’s character & apparent memories Where’s Brown?   ▯Parfit: 3 possibilities 1. Nowhere.  (B doesn’t survive 2. P or G, not both.  (B survives as one of the two 3. P & G.  (B survives as both 2 Parfit Objecting The 3 Possibilities i. He doesn’t survive. Given that we agreed: In #1, he could survive if his brain was successfully transplanted. In #2, he could survive, as people do, with half of his brain destroyed. Following through in #3, he could still survive if ½ brain was transplanted & ½ destroyed. Therefore: How could he not survive if the other ½ was also successfully transplanted? How come placing ½ of his brain somewhere else instead of destroying it ruin his survival? How could a double success be a failure?  ▯ruled out ii. He survives as one of the two, not both. “Each half of brain is exactly similar, and so, to start with, is each resulting person. So how can [Brown] survives as only one of the two people? What can make [Brown] one of them rather than the other” ­ Parfit Neither P or G has equal claim to be B, given that there’s no diff btw then (have same mentality,  same belief…) So how come one have more of a claim to be B than the other one  ▯ruled out iii. He survives as both.  1. Survival requires identity.  ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ 2. If B survives as P, then B = P  [1] If B survives as G, then B = G 3. Green ≠ Purple b/c they occupy diff spatial location at a single  time ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ 4. B doesn’t survive as both G & P [2­3]  ▯ruled out BUT!!!!! ~~~Paradox. We have good grounds to reject i, ii, iii, but one of them must be true~~!!! 3 MIND THEROY Parfit’s Claim To resolve a paradox requires showing how, despite appearances to the contrary, one option is  plausible  ▯(iii) surviving as both is possible 1a. If survival doesn’t require identity, then discussions of survival aren’t interesting—they         have little to do with discussions of personal identity. 1b. Questions of survival are interesting.        ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ 1. Survival requires identity.        ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ 2. If B survives as P, then B = P  [1] If B survives as G, then B = G 3. Green ≠ Purple b/c they occupy diff spatial location at a single  time ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ 4. B doesn’t survive as both G & P [2­3] Against 1a.  ▯Maybe  some question that is asked during discussions of “personal identity”  really is a question about identity. Many, many questions asked under that label, however, are  questions only about some weaker relation and that relation suffices for survival. Survival is what’s important but identity is at issues sometimes. In questions that actually  matter, survival and not identity is what’s important. Parfit may say that identity never matters  or that it matters for some uninteresting questions.   ▯1a is disproved  ▯1  ▯2  ▯4 4 Example Case: Brown owes Blue $100. Then ½ Brown’s brain in Green. ½ Brown’s brain in Purple. G&P both thought they owe Blue $100 until they saw each other. Green thinks he is off the hook b/c  once Purple got the other ½ brain, Green ceased to be identical with Brown. If G ceased to be identical with Brown, then G ceased to be liable for B’s debts  ▯since survival requires identity, so do responsibility Blue thinks otherwise  ▯Survival doesn’t require identity. We can talk about responsibility even if we give up  on identity.  Identity is not the issue when it comes to placing blame & responsibilities Parfait’s Argument for (iii) 1. If the operation kills B, then either his relation to G & P misses something that survival  requires or duplication precludes survival 2. B’s relation to each of G & P misses nothing.  ▯if this holds true for the case btw B and G, it should also hold to B and G&P.      same features for B’s survival in #1 has transferred twice in #4 3. Duplication doesn’t preclude survival. [double success ≠ failure] ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ 4. Operation doesn’t kill B 5. There’s no reason to choose only one of G & P ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ 6. Brown survives as both G & P Objection 1 Given that survival doesn’t require identity, why do we talk about personal identity? Even if survival doesn’t require identity, we ordinarily can think and talk sensibly about survival as if  it were just thought and talk about identity.   ▯cause there’s no branching in real life and its in fact one­one, therefore we can talk about it as  if its  about identity. “Even if psychological continuity is neither logically, nor always in fact, one­one, it can  provide a criterion of identity. For this can appeal to the relation of non­branching  psychological continuity, which is logically one­one. 5 MIND THEROY The criterion might be sketched as follows. X and Y are identical if they are psychologically  continuous and there is no person who is contemporary with either and psychologically  continuous with the other."  Objection 2 This is all pointless because what matters is in fact one­one.  People don’t actually branch! Even if #4  is possible, it is unlikely to oc
More Less

Related notes for PHL240H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit