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Political Philosoph1.docx

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Department
Philosophy
Course
PHL265H1
Professor
Joseph Heath
Semester
Fall

Description
Political Philosophy 09/10/13 - Hobbes=Absolute monarchy- same as Dante - One person should have unchallengeable authority - But Very different arguments even though same position - Why should there be coercion? - No coercion= no state necessary - Why do we have to follow rules? - Dante’s answer: because there is evil. He’s religious so he thinks evil will always be in everyone - Hobbes answer: we need it even if there were no evil people because of our goal in congruity. We all want different things. Even if we all want the same thing, we can’t all satisfy our desires. - What you may see as good and evil may be different to someone else - Make an agreement~ - Better to have a 3 person do the punishing if someone violates a law or agreement - We benefit from the coercion - Agreement is subject to constraints - Ex. Conditions of the Agreement. (Symmetry conditions) You can only get someone to give something up if you can do the same thing - Ex of this is Hobbes view of marriage - Men superior but women should initiate a state of war also - Marriage a contract - No marriage in the state of nature - Agreement has an equality structure - Hobbes thinks marriage is unnatural - Laws of nature things you need to do to get people into a contract - Golden Rule: don’t do something to someone else unless you want it to happen to you - Instituting the Sate - Right your natural freedom to use your own power to advance your own ends. (pg136) unlimited natural right to do anything we want. Rights naturally conflict. Ex. Both people say I have a right to the cheese burger because in the SON it is true - Liberty absence of formal force, no constraints in your region - Law opposite of r
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