Class Notes (837,009)
Canada (509,985)
Philosophy (1,521)
PHL265H1 (20)
N/ A (2)
Lecture 14

PHL 265H1F Lecture 14.docx

3 Pages
139 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHL265H1
Professor
N/ A
Semester
Fall

Description
PHL 265H1F  Hume’s argument • Point to his regards of fatally ambiguity (political authority is based on  consent to govt) • 2 concepts of work (Locke’s appeal moves back & forth among the appeals) • Fundamental difference b/n the idea that people consented • Identify ambiguity in tacit consent • Political obligations is like duty to keep promise, but it does not help to  explain to keep the promises • Once the reason is figured out, there is a parallel of answers. • The promises don't do work in the justification of the obligations • Does not doubt that most people would go with the law in their own political  system • E.g. Freely agree to obey with the king because we think that he is entitled to  the rule • If you agree to something because you think there is an obligations, then the  obligations is not part of the explanation • We have no basis for the living in the future • One should believe in everything beforehand and philosophies is established • Consent of the govern would not single out anything (in response to Locke’s  argument) • Start off by distinguishing two questions­ 1. Beginning of political society, 2.  • There is a way of formulating the point to make it important or make it true:  important­ e.g. follow the big crowd in a war; truth: the agreement does not  mean obligations (ambiguity: generating free will is not equal to generating  obligations) • There isn’t continuing obligations • Difference b/n consent and obligations: Consent: give someone the right to do sth to you; leave someone the  responsibility/ give them permission to do sth to you by not taking an extra  responsibility yourself (bind yourself to future if you make a promise) Obligations: • In order for consent to have real meanings, have to take place in proper space  of alternative • It must be undertaking the obligations is not the only alternative • With explicit obligations­>  • Tacitly consented is only if we assume that this is done with a proper space of  alternative (in response to Locke) • It is not possible to claim that a person voluntarily consent to a party when  there isn’t any suitable alternative  • There is no voluntarily acts that can be treated as the basis of the tacit consent  (tacit consent does not have purchase here) • E.g. sailor who lives on the ship is supposed to carry out the chores; he cannot  refuse to do so by tacitly consenting to the captain. (Therefore it shows that  tacit consent has no value here) • Can treat what you have done as consent but the only way to claim it as a  consent is to .. • Conclusion: the reason that you are bound to obey the government has nothing  to do with consent. The reason to have obligations to be consented  1. Part of natural morality (2 differential parts: easy/ hard,  inclination/obligation, natural virtues/artificial virtues) e.g. helping someone in  need because we feel i
More Less

Related notes for PHL265H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit