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Competiition & Winning (Jan 24).docx

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Department
Philosophy
Course
PHL376H1
Professor
T.J.Berry
Semester
Winter

Description
COMPETITION AND WINNING Competition in Sports Sport (Simon): mutually acceptable quest for excellence through challenge ­ You don’t have to win, you develop yourself, improve your skills by competing ­ It’s rule­govern, agree to the rules and participation, it’s cooperative Arguments that the goal to enhance the position of one competitor at the expensive of  others is selfish and immoral:  Immorality Argument: 1. Sport is essentially competitive 2.  Competitors are necessarily selfish   ­ Attack this premise by distinguishing selfishness vs self­interest 3. Selfishness is immoral 4. So, sport is necessarily immoral Inequality Argument: 1. Sport is essentially competitive 2. Competition introduces distinctions (inequality) between persons (ie: winner vs  loser) 3.  Source of inequality are morally objectionable   ­ Attack this premise by distinguishing R to equal treament vs R to  treatment as an equal 4. So, sport is morally objectionable Cooperation in sports does not remove competitiveness, there is still going to be a winner  and a loser in the sense that the challenge is better met by someone (the winner).  Competition against another allow us to assess and improve ourselves Competing with others vs Competing with former self ­ don’t need to compete against others for reference, can compete with former self  by setting the goal higher (raise the basketball net) Distinction between Selfishness and Self­interest Selfishness: do whatever to make your side prevail (no bounds) insist that your side does  prevail—not required for competition (not necessary) ­ selfishness keeps demanding that you play to a higher score Self­interest: you’re playing the game for yourself (you enjoy it or you want to enhance  your skills), win or lose is part of sports but 
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