PHL275H1 Lecture Notes - Lecture 14: Organ Transplantation, Ancient Philosophy, Deontological Ethics

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31 Oct 2016
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Anti-consequentialist/deontological moral theory disagrees with objections to consequentialism thus far: deontologists say that some acts with the best consequences are wrong. These distinctions killing/enabling and intending/foreseeing be separated, they can take on; when they are separated, each sometimes holds greater weight over the other and vice versa; this separation of distinction creates a dif culty in reaching a rm conclusion. However, utilitarianism can still make a counter-objection: the long-term effects of framing and executing an innocent person are sound reasons to abstain from the act of executing itself. D. w. ross, a writer on ancient philosophy and ethics (particularly metaethics), held similar views to moore, but differentiated on substantive morality. Ross also holds non-naturalist beliefs: moral propositions are self-evident and parallel to mathematics, similar to moore, moral judgements are objectively true/false. Note that moore believed that hedonism did not entail in pleasure necessarily.

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