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Lecture

Making Sense of the Rise in China

4 Pages
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Department
Political Science
Course Code
POL101Y1
Professor
Jeffrey Kopstein

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Nov 22 – Making Sense of the Rise of China
**essay portion of the exam will be based on this lecture and the next two**
Democracies do not fight democracies
-Democracies tend to pursue diplomatic channels of solution
-Tend to be more centred towards foreign trade
-Tend to be slow; conflicts may be solved in the process of engaging in war
During the cold war era, communist China was not internationally recognized
-The nationalist government in Taiwan was thought of as the official government
China begins to normalize diplomatic relations with United States and Canada
-Taiwan is no longer a country; the legitimate government of China resides in mainland
China
oTaiwan loses its sovereignty; “de jure Chinese province”
oDe facto” (in fact) independent state
Taiwan Relations Act (1979) – the U.S. will defend Taiwan if China ever decides to attack it
Anti-Secession Law (2005) – if Taiwan declares independence, China will attack
Arms Procurement Bill (2010) –
China is the second largest economy in the world; matter of time before it surpasses the U.S.
Soft Power
-Investment
-Energy security
-Beijing Consensus
-Cultural power – people want to learn about Chinese culture,
Chinas rise and the U.S. decline is a potential change in the international system
The International System
www.notesolution.com

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Description
Nov 22 Making Sense of the Rise of China **essay portion of the exam will be based on this lecture and the next two** Democracies do not fight democracies - Democracies tend to pursue diplomatic channels of solution - Tend to be more centred towards foreign trade - Tend to be slow; conflicts may be solved in the process of engaging in war During the cold war era, communist China was not internationally recognized - The nationalist government in Taiwan was thought of as the official government China begins to normalize diplomatic relations with United States and Canada - Taiwan is no longer a country; the legitimate government of China resides in mainland China o Taiwan loses its sovereignty; de jure Chinese province o De facto (in fact) independent state Taiwan Relations Act (1979) the U.S. will defend Taiwan if China ever decides to attack it Anti-Secession Law (2005) if Taiwan declares independence, China will attack Arms Procurement Bill (2010) China is the second largest economy in the world; matter of time before it surpasses the U.S. Soft Power - Investment - Energy security - Beijing Consensus - Cultural power people want to learn about Chinese culture, Chinas rise and the U.S. decline is a potential change in the international system The International System www.notesolution.com
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