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Lecture 8

POL101Y1 Lecture Notes - Lecture 8: Revanchism, Global City, Economic Inequality


Department
Political Science
Course Code
POL101Y1
Professor
Jeffrey Kopstein
Lecture
8

Page:
of 3
Thursday, November 26, 2015
POL 349 second last lecture
Divided Toronto
The divided city
The “three cities” of Toronto
Problems with social and Economic inequality
Where to go from here
Political Economy
Technologies of power
Everyday Urbanism
and Resistance
Changing space of
politics
Amalgamation, lean
goerment
Downloading , fewer
politician, bill 46
Resistance to
amalgamation
Global city strategy
Waterfront plan, olympic
bid, the competitive city
Revanchism, penal
commonsense,
entrereunlism
Diversity as PR strategy
but continued racism,
new immigrant politcal
forces
Rescaling ubran
imaniary
Global region, suburban
subdivisions
Re-regulation of city and
country-side, smart,
growth, loosening of
development controls
Reversal of downtown
imaniary, struggles over
Oak rides Morriane
Ecological
modernization
Development with
nature, privatization of
natural resources
Dergulation of
Environment
Anti Sprawl campaigns
New social Disparities
New economy
Americanization,
globalization
Cuts to welfare,
workfare programs, non
public housing, lowered
labour standards,
increase in working
time, bill 57
Redefined social norms,
welfarism stigmitized,
poverty made invisible,
anti-globalization
movement
Bourgeois ubrnism
Codo boom, high-end
culture
Gated communities,
private policing,
reduction in public
housing, end of rent
control
Priority of Housing
property, renters fight
back, homeless activism
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Thursday, November 26, 2015
Condo boom in the past 10 years
Greening technology in the water front
Challenges
-Lack of high quality jobs
widespread poverty
lack of affordable housing
Homelessness
Environmental concerns
traffic congestion and inadequate transit options
Urban- suburban conflicts
The divided City
First an foremost, the divided city is about the socio- economic status of who lives
where…. when we ask ourselves, “Why do some people live in some areas and not
others?’ - Money buys choice” (Hulchanski 2015)
Whats New?
A social spatial order with stronger and more rigid divisions
Greater inequality and polarity among parts of the city
Three cities
Income Inequality - city one, increase in income, high income area within the
boundaries of the old city of Toronto, aligned by transit lines. City two, no change in
income. City 3, Decrease in income. Higher percentage of single mother and children in
youth.
Housing Tenure, city 3 renters prevalent.
Immigrants
Education, much higher levels of university education in City one than in two or three
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Thursday, November 26, 2015
Travel times, mobility - City number 3 people commute far longer per day. Most subway
stations located in city number 1. City two 65% white.
Visible minorities - 82% white in city one, compared with 31% in City number 3
Income polarization
Ethno- Cultural and racial segregation
Three cities become two cities in 2025
City 1 and city 3 growth, decline of city 2
Urban inequality
Creation of two publics
Fosters elitism, resentment, fear, alienation
Social unrest, hostile to democracy
What can be done
Affordable housing
Public transit
social programs
new revenue tools
Shared funding
Tower renewal
De-amalgamation
anti discrimination
Re- distribution of wealth
3