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Lecture 11

lecture 11

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Department
Political Science
Course Code
POL101Y1
Professor
Janice Stein

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Semester 2
LECTURE 11
Genocide and Justice
-committed with intent to destroy, in whole or part, a national, ethnical,
racial, or religious group
The Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide
-occurs by:
okilling members of the group
ocausing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group
odeliberately inicting on the group conditions of life calculates to
bring about its physical destruction, in whole or in part
oimposing measures intended to prevent births within the group
oforcibly transferring children of one group to another
-acts directed against political groups are excluded from the denition of
genocide
Crimes Against Humanity
The Charter of the International Military Tribunal, passed in 1945, described
these atrocities as customary international crimes that justify international
criminal sanctions:
1. Crimes Against Humanity, namely:
a. Murder, enslavement, deportation, imprisonment, torture, rape, or
other inhumane acts
2. War Crimes, or violations of the laws and customs of war, namely:
a. Murder, ill-treatment, deportation for slave labour of for any other
purpose of the civilian populations of or in occupies territory
Di!erence between War Crimes and Crimes Against Humanity
-one instance of a reprehensible act could be a war crime, but not a crime
against humanity. The latter must be shown to have resulted from
widespread and systematic policy
-also crimes against humanity (e.g. destruction of property and systematic
persecution) can occur in any setting, while a war crime takes place only
during a war
The objections most frequently raised against the Convention on Genocide
include:
-the convention excludes targeted political and social groups
-proving intention beyond reasonable doubt is extremely di"cult
-the di"culty of dening or measuring in part”, and establishing how
many deaths equal genocide
Precedents
-Nuremberg Trials make governments accountable for what they make
their citizens do (e.g. Nazis)
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Description
Semester 2 LECTURE 11 Genocide and Justice - committed with intent to destroy, in whole or part, a national, ethnical, racial, or religious group The Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide - occurs by: o killing members of the group o causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group o deliberately inicting on the group conditions of life calculates to bring about its physical destruction, in whole or in part o imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group o forcibly transferring children of one group to another - acts directed against political groups are excluded from the denition of genocide Crimes Against Humanity The Charter of the International Military Tribunal, passed in 1945, described these atrocities as customary international crimes that justify international criminal sanctions: 1. Crimes Against Humanity, namely: a. Murder, enslavement, deportation, imprisonment, torture, rape, or other inhumane acts 2. War Crimes, or violat
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