POL326Y1 Lecture Notes - Meritocracy, Invisible Hand, David Easton

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Published on 17 Apr 2013
School
UTSG
Department
Political Science
Course
POL326Y1
POL326Y1- Lecture 2- Sept. 18, 2012
Over the last several centuries threats towards order in political communities such as Great
Britain or the United States came from internal upheavals, civil wars, conflicts between groups
within that society; had very little to do with outside invasion hence allocation within the society
became more necessary in order to assure stability within those communities.
Schimidt: German history of upheaval but from external sources, various principalities made up
Germany and their competing interests. Opposed to US and Britain they prioritized and put
resources into external security
o Therefore David Easton who advocates allocation also recognises the argument made by
Locke with regards to the necessity to protect a state from threats abroad before
property rights domestically can be protected (Second Treatise of
Government)…correlates with Schmidt’s view
o Schmidt argues that at the core of politics decisions is what collectivise can a peaceful
state coexist with, what other collectivises with regards to their interests and self-
definition are incompatible with their own security and survival
Confrontation of the cold war can be understood as a concern of how each of the states
allocates its resources, Communism threatened the survival of the US and capitalism and vice
versa with capitalism in Russia
Although US Foreign policy is different from other public policies in the sense that it involves
actions beyond domestic affairs, they are nonetheless actions taken by the state geared toward
the external environment
Kenneth Wall: Why is war re-occurrent?
o Focus on individuals, ex: WW2 and the peculiarities of individuals such as Hitler and in
other instances Mousilini and Stalin (Some argue that regardless of individuals the
events which occurred in history would be remained, other personalities would have
risen)…this applies to the decision to invade Iraq, it could be argued that had other
individuals been involved other than Bush, Rumsfield, Chenney, etc
o The State itself: Refers to the overall notion of democratic peace, specifically
democracies do not make war on other democracies. The internal makeup of that state
is important in terms of foreign policy and the likelihood of the state to take up arms
against other nations.
o International System and imbalances within it which explains the prevalence of war and
the foreign policies of governments based on the threats they face in that international
setting.
Theories of the State
- Liberal/Pluralist
o (Ex: David Easton, Locke, Rawls) See politics as allocation
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Document Summary

Over the last several centuries threats towards order in political communities such as great. Schimidt: german history of upheaval but from external sources, various principalities made up. Opposed to us and britain they prioritized and put resources into external security: therefore david easton who advocates allocation also recognises the argument made by. Locke with regards to the necessity to protect a state from threats abroad before property rights domestically can be protected (second treatise of. Confrontation of the cold war can be understood as a concern of how each of the states allocates its resources, communism threatened the survival of the us and capitalism and vice versa with capitalism in russia. Although us foreign policy is different from other public policies in the sense that it involves actions beyond domestic affairs, they are nonetheless actions taken by the state geared toward the external environment.

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