Class Notes (837,435)
Canada (510,273)
POL101Y1 (1,148)
Lecture

How the Rest Got Rich.docx

6 Pages
73 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POL101Y1
Professor
Jeffrey Kopstein
Semester
Fall

Description
How the Rest Got Rich: Political Economy 101 01/30/2012 “Capitalism an bureaucracy have found each other and belong intimately together.” –Max Weber, 1911 th 17    Century Dutch Hegemony    Holland was the richest country in this era th Success came from the decline of Spanish dominance in the end of the 16  century Dutch were the most efficient travellers of the sea They were multicultural Industrial innovation (windmills used to generate power to run industrial processes) Saw mills able to mass produce and mass ship wood products Modern finance One of the first countries to have a central bank Increase in the flow of capital Final result: Increased trade The Dutch didn’t make anything specific. They ‘sold’ the service of trade. Rise of Dutch­East Indian trading company. First multinational corporation that issued stock ▯ raised capital Mastered the mathematics of maritime insurance The Flute ship: Cheap to make due to the Dutch’s mechanization of industrial production. Required less  man power to operate. Shallow hull: Could go into shallow ports, unlike other ships that had to anchor in  deeper water: this allowed for more land trade. Hull had larger cargo capacity Market Principle Increase supply ▯ decrease price ▯ Increase consumption ▯ Increase trade of your good or service,  and, in turn, market share Example: Chinese manufacturing: Low wages, long hours, abundant labor. China therefore able to  increase its supply of finished goods with a reduction in price Principles of market Economy: Consumption is a function of price, negatively related Increase supply, decrease price, increase consumption Adam Smith,    he Wealth of Nations (1776)   Invisible hand of the market Concept of advantage: you want to get rich, make things that you are good at ▯ Specialization ▯  specializations become complementary ▯ Efficient division of labor Productive efficiency Universal division of labor – exports and imports On the Universal Economic Benefits of Free Trade “Under a system of perfectly free commerce, each country naturally devotes its capital and labor to  such employments as are most beneficial to each. The pursuit of individual advantage is admirably  connected with the universal good of the whole.” David Ricardo Cosmopolitical Vision: Smith and Ricardo were putting together a normative vision of how the world should be organized, as  well as a vision of governments’ role in the economy “Most of the state regulations for the promotion of public prosperity are unnecessary, and a nation in  order to be transformed from the lowest state of barbarism [the res] into a state of the highest possible  prosperity [England] needs nothing but bearable taxation, fair administration of justice and peace.”  Ada
More Less

Related notes for POL101Y1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit