Class Notes (837,435)
Canada (510,273)
POL101Y1 (1,148)
Bathelt (3)
Lecture

lecture 1 POL371.docx

13 Pages
93 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POL101Y1
Professor
Bathelt
Semester
Winter

Description
Table of contents 1. Why study the spatial political economy? 2. Space and territoriality 3. State, government and governance  4. Distance and proximity 5. Limitations to traditional regional science approaches 6. Alternative design of a relational approach 7. Dimensions of a relational analysis 8. The relational approach 1. Why study the spatial political economy? ­ Goals of this course To understand how economic agents shape the political economy  To explore how jobs (income opportunities) are created, and in which cities/regions/nations  To understand which economic/social/cultural/political factors influence economic decisions in  production  ­ Economic activities are not equally distributed in space They are highly concentrated in some regions (developed/ metropolitan/industrialized regions) They are rare in other regions (peripheral/less­developed/ rural regions) 1. Why study the spatial political economy? Fundamental disparities exist between places/cities/regions/ countries/national states THUS: we need to understand the heterogeneity within national states ­ Aspects to be investigated in this course To understand why regional/national disparities exist  To understand how location decisions are made To understand how economic activities are organised and how this differs between places/regions To understand why industries in some regions grow faster than in others To understand how policies can support economic growth/ innovation 1. Why study the spatial political economy? ­ Characteristics of the course  This course is about economic action, NOT about the state The course applies a strong spatial perspective It is primarily conceptual using empirical examples when needed It employs a relational framework of economic action and interaction in space It argues that economic action is not determined by economic principles/spatial structures alone → Economic action is social in character  The course is inter­disciplinary combining economics/ economic geography/political  economy/sociology 2. Space and territoriality  (a)            Spaces of human territoriality  ­ Home as a space of refuge and confidence To be defended against intruders To create a barrier “My space” differs between cultures/regions (e.g. single­family homes in the US mid west vs. small  rental apartments in large cities) Look at students in China who room with 6­7 people as in relation  to Canada where it is 1­2.  Correlation between status and size of personal territory When communities are spread out in the  world when you met someone who is from the same place as you than it.   Protocols (rule books) regulate how space is used and shared (e.g. in classrooms/firms/sports  arena) ­ Neighbourhoods as territories Ethnic groups tend to agglomerate in particular quarters of cities (more strongly in North America  than Europe) Enforced segregation can stimulate opposition/resistance  2. Space and territoriality ­ Cities/regions/states as territories Regional loyalties help make friends/share beliefs Example China: same home region as a basis to develop relationships Example India: Palanpuris networks and diamond trade (d) Territoriality and the state The modern nation state developed in 17th century Europe All the feudal states were different with  different standards everywhere. Then it was hard to trade on a high scale. Over the next many  years the nation­state was born allowed more communication and oppurtunities  Feudal systems with individual sovereignty formed dominions with national sovereignty Territoriality as a strategy to access/control resources 3. State, government and governance  (a)            State as an independent country  ­ Criteria of states Sovereignty (independence without external control)  Recognition (states must be recognised by the international community/other states) ­ Characteristics Area/territory with recognised limits (boundaries) Permanent resident population Government (defines institutional settings)  Organised economy (state defines settings: currency/ foreign trade rules/capital­labour  relationships) The state influences the economy. The state is the one that invests for example by  way of infastructure Circulation system (transporting/distributing goods/people/ ideas from one place/segment to  another)  3. State, government and governance (b) Nation state vs. national state A nation­state is a nation (reasonably large group of people with common culture) which has its  own territory Canada is clearly not a nation state in this sense, BUT an example of a multi­nation state THEREFORE, we will use the term national state in class (c) Economic importance of the state  The national state creates consistent conditions for economic interaction:  language/education/employment/trade This makes economic interaction much easier/less costly State polices impact the conditions for economic production/ trade  3. State, government and governance ­ State is itself an important economic agent  (a) Through entrepreneurial activities/state­owned firms (b) On the demand side through investments (d) Regional vs. national state level Some analyses in Europe argued that the national state declines in importance through EU  integration Competencies would be shifted toward the supra­national and regional levels (hollowing  out/“glocalisation”)  BUT: the national state is still important defining basic conditions of economic interaction (e.g.  national egoisms during current Euro crisis) The regional state also has an impact on economic action/ location decisions 3. State, government and governance  (e)            Government vs. governance  ­ Traditionally, political science emphasises the role of government in structuring the economy  Focus on the role of the federal government  ­ “Governance” increasingly replaces “government” as a concept  Move away from the authority of the central state Giving to local and regional states because they  know what we need much more  Governance involves authority at different levels  Other groups of actors (e.g. firm networks/associations)/ economic self­governance) NGOs as well  have an impact   →  We use a governance understanding in this course 4. Distance and proximity ­ In notions of territoriality and the state, there is always a tension between distance and proximity  Firms need their own territories/distance to others You want some privacy and secrecy sometimes Proximity within political territories is beneficial: institutions create conditions which make it easy to  interact  (a) Types of distance ­ In conventional models, it is often assumed that the frequency/ intensity of interaction is a  declining function of distance ­ Physical distance ­ Economic distance (costs) If there are large transport costs that is a downside, but it is low  enough that it is not a problem compared to the value of the product Some industries are sensitive to transportation costs (e.g. iron/steel), others are not (e.g.  semiconductors)  4. Distance and proximity Under present conditions, transportation costs are often not decisive to explain industrial location  patterns BUT: due to peak oil/global climate change, this will change ­ Social distance If social distance (i.e. between social groups) is too great, interaction becomes more difficult (lack  of trust) Social distance is not always linked to spatial distance BUT: social distance impacts spatial patterns (for instance, if agents drive a long distance to do  shopping where people of similar status go shopping)  4. Distance and proximity (b) Types of proximity ­ Key challenge of industrial organization is how to integrate raw materials/machinery/employees in  such a way as to establish efficient production An important strategy to exercise control/coordinate production is to establish proximity Spatial proximity Reduces transportation costs Reduces costs of acquiring information about transaction partners Helps generate trust/reduces risks of inter­firm cooperation 4. Distance and proximity ­ Institutional/cultural proximity How close does proximity have to be? How close do firms have to be to overlook their work? An outer boundary for close interaction might
More Less

Related notes for POL101Y1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit