POL300Y Lecture Sept 27.docx

6 Pages
129 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POL300H1
Professor
Jody Boyer/ Tom Malleson
Semester
Fall

Description
POL300Y Lecture #3 Sept 27 , 2012 Quiz • Short answers: o Terms  Define  What is their significance? o Key quotations from text  Identify (ex. King’s ‘Love Your Enemy’  What does the passage mean? What is its broader significance of  the passage in the text as a whole? Review: • Smrti • Arjuna • Zealots • Anti­Judaism • Malicide • Slave mortality • Hisma (a­hisma) • Canons of perfection • Renunciation of fruits of action • Agape • Peaceable kingdom • Impossible ideal • J. Robert Oppenheimer Key Points Last Week: • Religions possess rival traditions on violence and non­violence • Religious texts are interpreted on these questions in multiple ways • Feedback loop between east and west in creation of ideology of “non­violence  resistance” • Renouncing Fruits o Monastic answer o Gita: worldly obligations vs. renunciation o Oppenheimer: duty= calling, job.  o Gandhi: duty= moral law. Highest obligation  Self­sacrificial love and care. Unfolding dynamic of people taking  care of each other. Henry Thoreau 1817­1862: • Foundational figure of early American religion  • Had very powerful friends and very powerful enemies • Concept of civil disobedience • John Rawls (1971) defines ‘Civil Disobedience’ as; a public, non violent and  conscientious breach of law undertaken with the aim of bringing about a change  in laws or government policies • “an unjust law is itself a species of violence. Arrest for its breach is more so.  Now the law of nonviolence…” Gandhi • Intellectual Sources: o Transcendentalism  Rejection of Unitarianism, rational religion, miracles “evidence”  of the truth of Christianity, order, harmony, rationalism  Draws from German Idealism, English Romanticism: Samuel  Coleridge  Connection to divine through nature that goes beyond sense • Intuition • Feeling  Walden Pond 1854 • Authentic identity • Moved to the pond and wanted to be alone with the  essence of nature • True economy • Experimental communion with nature o Eat a woodchuck raw • “I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately” • “The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation” • “There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to  one who is striking at the root”  Walden and Civil Disobedience • Rich already sold themselves • Self­sufficient less at risk  o Eastern philosophy  Influence from eastern philosophers, the gita, etc.  o Christian sectarianism   Read “sermon of the mount” literally  Separatist: “come out and be separate..” the world’s evil “violent”.  “be perfect as your heavenly Father is perfect…”  Mennonite, Quakers, Moravians groups proliferate after the  protestant reformation. Source of religious authority, right way to  relate to God? • Rejection of priests, ritual, sacraments as a way of relating  to God o Radical individualism  Direct, unmediated relationship with God.   Mennonites: • Scriptural literalists • Non­resistance “do not resist and evildoer” • Quietist: sectarian, not political or involved in polis or  civic, involved in the life of the city (civitas) • Perfectionistic: “the perfect law of love, not just fear of  punishment” o How state governs are radically different from how  the church should govern, magistrate dwells in the  sinful world. Can’t be a Christian and a  government official who makes use of the “sword  of state”  Quakers: • Conversion to be true, must be freely chosen. So coercion  on matters of faith is deeply wrong • Quakers: direct revelation to the individual. Inner light in  each individual. Direct experience of the divine.  • Individual conscience is spark of divinity within. Must be  followed at all costs. • More committed to social activism than early Mennonites  (reformists)  Puritan: • Disparage outer shows of morality • Tension between reformist drive and separatist drive • City on the Hill­ gives up trying to change England, offer  them a pure, distilled example of a perfect commonwealth.  o Classical republicanism  Opposition to a standing army  A republic requires virtue  Luxury is always an omnipresent threat  American context of republicanism: “how can we avoid the  tyranny of the many”  Desire for policies to be shaped by reason, higher law, and not  base self­interest.  English Whigs—self­sufficiency= property
More Less

Related notes for POL300H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit