Class Notes (835,107)
Canada (508,933)
POL326Y1 (69)
Lecture

POL326Y Lecture May 14.docx

5 Pages
70 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POL326Y1
Professor
Arnd Jurgensen
Semester
Summer

Description
POL326Y Lecture May 14/2013 • Important to keep in mind the differences in terminology used by scholars in the field of  political science/ international relations • Policies function through the basic assumption that people view politics as a competition  within society • In IR generally, the core matter of politics and foreign policy is seen as having to do with  security  o The main aim of foreign policy is to provide security for political states/communities o The assumption is therefore states are rational actors that peruse their own security,  survival, and are rational because they can recognize their vulnerabilities, put together  a list of policy options to deal with those vulnerabilities, and subjecting those options  to a cross­benefit discussion to figure which one would work best for them o Regime type doesn’t really matter, because in reality everyone is just looking out for  their own security interests o To what extent does the US function as a rational actor? o To what extent are the policies of the US shaped through domestic politics? o If they are shaped by domestic politics is the outcome rations?  Does it maintain their security?  OR, does this proposition result in policies that do not enhance the security of the  US but might undermine the security of the US. • The theories of the state o Policies are the outputs of states  In terms of efforts produced by states  Important to understand what states are, etc.   The nature of states o Number of answers as to what states are  o Dominant paradigm is the liberal­pluralists approach to understanding states  Easton  Politics as a competition between different groups and individual over allocation  processes within a society   State is essentially the neutral arena in which this competition takes place   This competition over influence over the state takes place through elections,  legislatures, efforts to lobby decision makers, etc.,  • Through this policy is produced  The state is viewed as a NEUTRAL entity   Inputs (elections) outputs (policy)  Liberal­pluralists view the state as a social contract model   Agreement between the people of a political community about how to manage  their common affairs  There are fairly prominent examples of “contracts” that could be pointed to in  regards to policy (the US Constitution)  The state is a ‘dependent variable’  To understand policy you can’t look to the state itself, but the different groups  within a state which form the policies  This view is partially shared by another school of thought­  the Marxist approach o The Marxist Approach  Share one thing in common with liberal­pluralists  Believe that politics is a matter of allocation   Sees the state as a dependent variable  The state is not neutral but rather reflects the interests of dominant elites within  any political society   Marxists are not all identical in these inclinations, there are 2 prominent varieties  of Marxist explanations • 1. Instrumentalist Approach o Tend to view the state as an instrument for the dominant elites  Dominant sources come from theorist like Steve Mills  (“power elite”)  Focuses on the common perceptions of the elites that run  the state and the elites that run the private economy   The state is an instrument of the dominant economic elites,  therefore policy reflects interests of dominant elites  The state has to have the ability to do things that the ruling  elites are not comfortable with   The state requires relative autonomy   Ex. Bush administration and the oil industry   The policy of the Bush administration was shaped by  dominate economy elites • 2. Structuralist Approach  o  “The ruling class does not rule” o Structuralist don’t deny the realities that the instrumentalists point  out  They believe that these things however aren’t important   States act the way that they do because of the structural  position the occupy within a social system   The state does what it does because of forces that are  acting upon the state o Statists  Argue that the state is not a dependent variable, but rather an independent  variable’  Who occupies the office, leads the country doesn’t really matter  Extraction­coercion model  • Looks atthhe emergence of states in places like Prussia • Early 17  century was a minor region of central Europe  • King Frederic relied on a small army to kept control over his relatively  small territory  o Used them to extract resources (taxation) o Used revenues to heir army, to expand territory, to get more  resources, etc. etc. therefore expanded the Prussian state o He innovated institutions for the regular extraction of resources o  To compete with Prussian as a growing power, Prussians  neighbors therefore needed to input similar processes for  extraction  o The argument is that states produced capitalists relations of  production­ states are in the drivers seat, therefore they are an  independent variable  o In the after math of the collapse of the soviet union, the US faced 
More Less

Related notes for POL326Y1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit