Class Notes (905,625)
CA (538,479)
UTSG (45,721)
PSY (3,649)
PSY322H1 (18)
Lecture

Sociocultural Approach

6 Pages
115 Views

Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSY322H1
Professor
Alison Chasteen

This preview shows pages 1-2. Sign up to view the full 6 pages of the document.
PSY322 Lecture 02: Sociocultural Approach
Readings: Lavine, Sweeney, & Wagner (1999), Iijima, Hall & Crum (1994)
Outline
- Gender Stereotypes
o Trends in Print Media
o Effects of TV ads & sitcoms
Face-isms, objectification
x Cognitive and behavioral consequences
Body image, female weight
- Diversity in TV ads t not as much research compared to with gender!
Gender Stereotypes in Print Media
- What do we see in ads published in print media?
o XPX<]ouP^}oµ]}vW^dZKoPz}µ[oo µooÇ>}À_
Bag NOT main picture
Unflattering portrayal of old women
No head! t Z(}v}ÁÇ}^uv]Ì_}Ç
o E.g. In-flight Magazine Ad: Sony Noise-cancelling Headphones
Old woman are annoying
No heads! t oÁ]Z^uPZ}v_
- t}uv[}Çparts > faces
- Dv[(E}]~Z(}KWWK^/d}(Á}uv[
- Frequency of appearance
- Implications of face-isms
o Stereotypes of women (transmitted in ads)
Less face-ism
hv]voo]PvU]À}ÇÁ]Zv}}vo]ÇUv}^]v]À]µo_
- More likely to show man to promote object, as well as face; if women, show more body
Gender Stereotypes in TV Ads
- Do we see similar stereotyping in television commercials?
Iijima Hall and Crum (1994) KEYWORD = Tv ads study
o Beer commercials
o Few minorities app]v~](ZÇ}UµµooÇ^lP}µv_
o More men than women in ads
o Chest shots: men < women
49% woman (chest shot) vs. 24% man (chest shot)
o Body shots: men < women
Twice as many of women than men
o Implications?
Women seen as BODY not HUMAN
Women: exterior > interior, de-humanizing
- CURRENTLY: see a shift to men ads focusing on body image (buff)
www.notesolution.com
Effects of Exposure to Sexist TV Ads
- What are the cognitive and behavioral outcomes of exposure?
Gender Stereotypes in TV Ads: Reading 01
Rudman and Borgida (1995) KEYWORD = Interview study
o tZ((}Æ]]uPZÀ}v}o[cognitions and behaviors?
o Method:
Sample: Undergraduate men (~50-60 @ 25-30 per condition)
Design: Sexist video vs. control (videos)
Procedure
x Rate 20 ads on several dimensions (rate like/dislike)
x Lexical decision task: sexist words and sexual double entendres (e.g. cherry,
easy t see response time after sexist/control ads)
o Lexical task: word/non-word task; indicate if string of letters form a
word
o Hypothesis: faster to identify as words if shown SEXIST ads
x Interview a female candidate for a job ~}oo^ZÀ]}_VP]Àvµ
to ask questions; observed comments, etc. towards female candidate)
Results
x Lexical Decision Task
o Reaction Time vs. Type of Word
o Conditions (#bars per independent [x] variable) = Sexist, Control
o Sexist = babe, bimbo; Nonsexist = sister, mother; Double = cherry,
easy; Neutral; Non-words
o Sexist condition: FASTER response than control group
o More SLOWLY with nonsexist words than control group
WHY: sexist images activate concepts and thoughts in minds,
thus less space for nonsexist words
x Recall Results t ^t]}ÁvuµZÇ}µvoo}µ(uo
v]_
o Mean Recall Scores vs. Appearance / Bio Info / # Written (a.k.a.
Qualifications)
o Conditions = Sexist, Control
o Sexist group focused on APPEARANCE
o Therefore, additional evidence that cognitive impact of exposure to
such ads!
x Social Judgments
o Mean Competence Rating vs. Sexist/Control
o Sexist rated candidate as LESS COMPETENT (probably focused on
APPEARANCE over Bio and Qualifications)
x Sexualized Behavior (towards female candidate/confederate)
o How often felt participant (P) look at body, how sexually motivated P
was, how sexist P seemed
o DvZ]vPÀX}v(~^v]_
/Proximity/Dominance/Sexual Behavior
NOTE: Proximity+Dominance+Sexual Behavior measured by
observers (3rd party)
x Observers watched video of participants (Ps) toward
candidate
o LOWER means BUT sexist > control in
ratings still!!!
o Conditions = Sexist, Control
www.notesolution.com

Loved by over 2.2 million students

Over 90% improved by at least one letter grade.

Leah — University of Toronto

OneClass has been such a huge help in my studies at UofT especially since I am a transfer student. OneClass is the study buddy I never had before and definitely gives me the extra push to get from a B to an A!

Leah — University of Toronto
Saarim — University of Michigan

Balancing social life With academics can be difficult, that is why I'm so glad that OneClass is out there where I can find the top notes for all of my classes. Now I can be the all-star student I want to be.

Saarim — University of Michigan
Jenna — University of Wisconsin

As a college student living on a college budget, I love how easy it is to earn gift cards just by submitting my notes.

Jenna — University of Wisconsin
Anne — University of California

OneClass has allowed me to catch up with my most difficult course! #lifesaver

Anne — University of California
Description
PSY322 Lecture 02: Sociocultural Approach Readings: Lavine, Sweeney, & Wagner (1999), Iijima, Hall & Crum (1994) Outline - Gender Stereotypes o Trends in Print Media o Effects of TV ads & sitcoms Face-isms, objectification N Cognitive and behavioral consequences Body image, female weight - Diversity in TV ads J not as much research compared to with gender! Gender Stereotypes in Print Media - What do we see in ads published in print media? o :2:}_ Bag NOT main picture Unflattering portrayal of old women No head! J Z}L}}^ZKL]_} o E.g. In-flight Magazine Ad: Sony Noise-cancelling Headphones Old woman are annoying No heads! J o ]Z^K2Z}LZ_ - J}KL[Z}parts > faces - ,L[Z Z-}]Z~Z}K99K^@}}KL[Z - Frequency of appearance - Implications of face-isms o Stereotypes of women (transmitted in ads) Less face-ism DL]Loo]2L7 ]}]ZL}Z}Lo]7L}^]L]]oZ_ - More likely to show man to promote object, as well as face; if women, show more body Gender Stereotypes in TV Ads - Do we see similar stereotyping in television commercials? Iijima Hall and Crum (1994) KEYWORD = Tv ads study o Beer commercials o Few minorities app]LZ~]Z}7Zoo^ l2}L_ o More men than women in ads o Chest shots: men < women 49% woman (chest shot) vs. 24% man (chest shot) o Body shots: men < women Twice as many of women than men o Implications? Women seen as BODY not HUMAN Women: exterior > interior, de-humanizing - CURRENTLY: see a shift to men ads focusing on body image (buff) www.notesolution.com
More Less
Unlock Document


Only pages 1-2 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit