Class Notes (834,037)
Canada (508,290)
Psychology (3,518)
PSY100H1 (1,627)
Nick Rule (7)
Lecture 7

Psy421 lecture 7.docx

8 Pages
166 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY100H1
Professor
Nick Rule
Semester
Winter

Description
Cues to Leadership Summary What are the 4 tenets of the ecological model of social perception? How is Brunswick’s lens model different from the ecological model? What are the 4 stages of the RAM model? What is the attractiveness halo effect? What is the babyface overgeneralization effect? What in women’s faces predicts their marital satisfaction? When does babyfacedness help you in court? What is the lack of fit model? Who is more likely to be honored for military bravery? Why? Who wins elections in japan? In North America? How can you judge SES from a person’s body? What kind of surgeons get sued for malpractice? Outline Definitions of first impressions Predicting CEO leadership success from appearance Female CEOs and role congruity theory Predicting law firm managing partner success from appearance Predicting success from appearance over time Consensus vs accuracy Neural correlates of predicting First impressions Ubiquitous and consequential First impressions of teachers predict evaluations (Amady and Rosenthal, 1993) Perceptions of faces predict  Subjective outcomes Both predictor and outcome are subjective Teachers’ evaluations are based on students’ opinions Electoral outcomes based on voters’ opinions Opinions predicting others’ opinions First impressions Objective outcomes: ­ Opinions predicting external criteria o Opinions still subjective o But outcome not a consequence of opinions Example: ­ Opinions of CEOs leadership abilities predicting company success Naïve raters ­> CEOs’ faces  ­ relationship indirect at best 50 people rated personality traits: (1(not at all X) – 7 (very X) Competent? Dominant/submissive?        POWER Mature­faced? Likeable? Trustworthy?                                       WARMTH 50 more people How successful at leading a company? Not all successful (1) ­­­­­­­­­­ very successful (7) Fortune 1000 CEOs  Physically homogenous sample: All Caucasian men Narrow age range ­Correlate power, warmth, and success with revenues, profits ­ Control for attractiveness, expression, age ­ Leadership judgments predict profits but not revenues ­ Profits gold standard for a leader’s success in business ­ Company revenues scale with size (basis for fortune rankings) Results: CEOs look more powerful = companies more profits (r = 0.37) Perceived as better leader = companies more profits ( r = 0.30) The CEOs rated as more powerful/ better leaders actually lead more successful companies Management literature: Mixed/no relationship between CEO behavior/personality and company performance (agle et al,  2006) Here: Naïve first impressions of CEOs traits from faces predicted company performance Less is more? What about women? ­ Previous study only male CEOs ­ 2% of fortune 1000 CEOs in FY2006 were female ­ Women lead differently than men (mixed evidence) ­ Role congruity theory (eagle et  karay) o concepts of “woman” and “leader” in opposition Clinton’s task: being likeable AND tough Can women’s success be accurately predicted from first impressions, despite stereotypes? All 20 female CEOs from fortune 1000: 2006 90 people rated the same traits (competence, dominance, etc) 80 people rated likely success leading Results: similar pattern as with men Competence correlated with profits (r=0.52) Leadership correlated with profits (r=0.60) Conclusion: Traits matter, not gender Face is your fate? ­ Innate appearance ­ Consistent across time ­ Predict later outcomes (Collins & zebrowitz 1995) Dorian Gray effect? ­ Look acquired ­ Experiences shape development of appearance (zebrowitz et al 1998) New domain” law firms amlow 100 – America’s top 100 law firms 2007 ­ Full distribution of targets (all 100 ranks) ­ Tenure­like promotion system ­ Both male and female managing partners (5%) ­ Additional dependent variables o Profit margin o Profitability index o Profits per equity partner (PPP) ­ Additional controls o Years of experience o Size of law first Undergrad graduation photos acquired for 73/100 Rated on same traits (power, warmth) with same control variables Produce the same results: Power correlated with profits Face is your fate     or     Dorian gray effect?  Looks more like face is your fate Judgments of leaders are highly predictive/meaningful? First impressions can predict important real­world outcomes How do we do this? Consensus – agreement in impressions “Obama is likeable because everybody likes him” Accuracy – correspondence between impression and outcome criterion (predictive validity) “Madoff looks trustworthy”    ……………but master of world’s worst Ponzi scheme Consensus ­­­ ▯accuracy but doesn’t work other way around Examining brain response may reveal process  Neural correlates Neural correlates of subjective impressions well known Hypothesis: the amygdala will respond in accord with evaluations of leadership Question: will this response be validated by external criteria? And if so, why? Hypotheses about amygdala response:  ­ Negative valence: (todorov & ­ Increased motivational significance/stimulus salience/arousal (Andersen et al, 2003,  Cunningham et al 2004) Hypotheses about leadership: ­ Power associated with CEO success (Kaplan et al 2
More Less

Related notes for PSY100H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit