Class Notes (835,242)
Canada (509,043)
Psychology (3,518)
PSY100H1 (1,627)
Lecture

Mind is Adaptive II Nov 7.docx

6 Pages
65 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY100H1
Professor
Wagner Denton
Semester
Winter

Description
PSY 100  November 7, 2013  Mind is Adaptive II  Sleep  1. Your brain “shuts down” or “turns off” during sleep – True or False?  ­ Alert wakefulness: beta waves (short, rapid waves)  ­ Just before sleep: alpha waves  ­ Stage 1: theta waves ­ Stage 2: sleep spindle, k complex ­ Stage 3: delta waves  ­ Stage 4: delta waves  2. While sleeping, you have no awareness of what is going on around you? True or  False?  ­ FALSE, we are sensitive to sounds that are important to us (like crying baby)  3. You only dream during REM sleep – True or false?  ­ REM sleep: the stage of sleep marked by rapid eye movements, dreaming, and  paralysis of motor systems  ­ Dreams during REM sleep tend to be bizarre, illogical, and emotional  ­ Arise from activation of the emotion, motivation, reward, and visual centers of the  brain  4. Staying up all night studying makes sense, since you don’t learn while you sleep.  – True or false?  ­ Three general explanations for the adaptive­ness of sleep:  ­ It facilitates learning, these new connections are formed during sleep  ­ REM sleep is important for learning, those who dreamt about the activity performed  it better than anybody else  ­ Restorative theory: we sleep because our bodies need to restore themselves,  growth hormones are released during sleep. It needs this chance to recuperate ­ Circadian rhythm theory: All animals sleep because it keeps them safe from  danger during parts of the day when they are most susceptible to danger  ­ Facilitation of learning theory: new material that we learned that day are formed  through neural connections that we acquire during sleep  5. Consuming alcohol will help you fall asleep better – True or False?  ­ Alcohol may help you fall asleep faster… ­ But it messes up your sleep cycle and the quality of the sleep you get  ­ Lightens sleep ­ Wake more frequently  ­ Trouble returning to sleep ­ Less REM sleep  ­ Increases sleep apnea and insomnia  Learning  • An enduring change in behavior resulting from experience  • The essence of learning is understanding how events are related • Conditioning: A process in which environmental stimuli and behavioral  responses become connected  Classical Conditioning • A type of learning in which a neutral stimulus comes to elicit a reflexive response  because it has become associated with a stimulus that already produces a response • Key Terms:  • Unconditioned stimulus (US) • Unconditioned response (UR) • Conditioned stimulus (CS)  • Conditioned response (CR)  • Acquisition: The gradual formation of an association between the conditioned  and unconditioned stimuli  • Extinction: A process in which the conditioned response is weakened when  the conditioned stimulus is repeatedly presented without the unconditioned  stimulus  • Spontaneous recovery: A process in which a previously extinguished  response re­emerges following presentation of the conditioned stimulus • Stimulus generalization: Occurs when stimuli that are similar but not  identical to the conditioned stimulus produce the conditioned response • Stimulus discrimination: A differentiation between two similar stimuli when  only one of them is consistently associated with the unconditioned stimulus  • Second order conditioning: When something is consistently paired with the  conditioned stimulus, without the unconditioned stimulus, and leads to a  conditioned response  Phobias  • Phobias are acquired fears that are out of proportion to the real threat of the object  of situation  Classical Conditioning: Later Developments  • Not all CS­CR pairings are the same!  • Some associations are easier to learn than others  • Conditioned food aversion: Associating a particular food with an unpleasant  outcome. Can be formed in one trial, even if the illness doesn’t occur right away  • Biological preparedness: Refers to the idea that animals are genetically  programmed to fear some objects more than other. I.e. Phobias about snakes and  heights are more common than phobias about squirrels and staplers Role of Cognition  • Why is a slight delay between the CS and US optimal for learning –  Prediction • In order for learning to take place, the CS must accurately predict the US  • Rescorla­Wagner model: A cognitive model of classical conditioning which  states that the strength of the CS­US association is determined by the extent to  which the US is unexpected or surprising  • Because this leads to greater effort by the animal to understand why the US  has appeared what is in the environment that may have produced the event  Operant Conditioning  • A learning process in which the consequences of an action determine the  likelihood that it will be performed in the future  • Key terms: positive and negative reinforcement, positive and negative  punishment, schedules of reinforcement: fixed, variable, ratio, interval  • Thorndike’s law of effect: Any behavior that leads to a satisfying state of affairs  will more likely occur again, and any behavior that leads to an annoying state of  affairs will less likely to occur  • Reinforcer: A stimulus that occurs after a response and increases the likelihood  that the response will be repeated. Primary versus secondary re­inforcers  (primary: biologically based food water) (secondary: money) • Shaping: Involves reinforcing behaviours that are increasingly similar to the  desired behavior  • Reinforcing successive approximations eventually produces the desired behavior  by teaching the animal to discriminate which behavior is being reinforced • Positive reinforcement: Increases the probability of a behavior being repeated by  the administration of a (positive, rewarding) stimulus  • Negative reinforcement: Increases the probability of a behavior being repeated  by the removal of a (negative, aversive) stimulus  • Positive punishment: Decreases the probability of a behavior being repeated by  the administration of a (negative, punishing) stimulus • Negative punishment: Decreases the probability of a behavior being repeated by  the removal of a (positive, pleasurable) stimulus  Operant Conditioning: Schedules of Reinforcement  • Continuous reinforcement: results in fast learning, but also fast extinguishing as  soon as the reinforcement is removed • Partial reinforcement: A type of learning in which behavior is reinforced  inter
More Less

Related notes for PSY100H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit